New-breed global investors and financial stability

Gaston Gelos, Hiroko Oura, 23 August 2014

The landscape of portfolio investment in emerging markets has evolved considerably over the past 15 years. Financial markets have deepened and become more internationally integrated. The mix of global investors has also changed, with more money intermediated by mutual funds. This column explains that these changes have made capital flows and asset prices in these economies more sensitive to global financial shocks. However, broad-based financial deepening and improved institutions can enhance the resilience of emerging-market economies.

Firm growth and large jumps

Yoshiyuki Arata, 23 August 2014

One of the main models in industrial organisation assumes that firms grow in a response to many small shocks that satisfy the central limit theorem. This column shows that if the shocks do not follow the central limit theorem, then the firm growth follows a jump process. Such large jumps could be due to radical innovation and are vital for the long-term success of a firm.

Minority mortgage market and the Crisis

Stephen L. Ross, 22 August 2014

The foreclosure crisis that followed the subprime crisis has had significant negative consequences for minority homeowners. This column reviews recent evidence in the racial and ethnic differences in high cost loans and in loan performance. Minority homeowners, especially black homebuyers, faced higher price of mortgage credit and had worse credit market outcomes during the crisis. This is largely due to the fact that minority borrowers are especially vulnerable to the economic downturn.

Pricing and EZ membership: Evidence from Latvia

Alberto Cavallo, Brent Neiman, Roberto Rigobon, 22 August 2014

What happens to prices when a country joins a currency union, and do prices behave differently in a pegged exchange rate regime? This column sheds lights on these questions by using evidence from Latvia, whose currency was pegged to the euro before the country became a Eurozone member on 1 January 2014. The authors find that clothing retail prices in Latvia completely converged to those in other Eurozone countries.

How can we measure media power?

Andrea Prat, 22 August 2014

The potential for political influence is what most people think of when they talk about the power of the media. A new media power index, proposed in this column, aggregates power across all platforms and focuses not on markets but on voters. It measures not actual media influence but rather its potential. Using the index, the author finds that the four most powerful media companies in the US are television-based and the absolute value of the index is high. This indicates that most American voters receive their news from a small number of news sources, which creates the potential for large political influence.

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