Davide Consoli, Giovanni Marin, David Popp, Francesco Vona, 22 May 2015

The greening of the economy brings with it changes in the demand for certain skills in the labour market. Understanding these changes has important implications for policy aiming to support sustainable industry. This column uses US data to identify key green jobs and the skills of import for them. Environmental sustainability regulations are shown to affect the demand for green skills in the labour market. Labour market policies should target labour supply, for instance through education, to avoid potential skill gaps down the line.

Masayuki Morikawa, 22 May 2015

World trade in services is increasing rapidly but micro evidence remains scarce. This column employs firm data from Japan to argue that service-exporting firms are more productive than non-exporting firms and goods-exporting firms. Information asymmetry, transportation costs, differences in institutions, cultures, and languages increase the fixed costs of service trade. Therefore, highly productive firms are more likely to self-select into service trade.   

Carmen Broto, Luis Molina, 21 May 2015

Credit ratings agencies have enormous power over countries in dire straits. But whether prevailing global economic conditions affect their assessments is rarely asked. This column suggests that credit ratings agencies overreact in downgrading countries credit ratings during times of economic crisis and instability, and underreact when upgrading during calmer times. This is bad news for policymakers who think that strong economic performance will get them back the credit rating they once took for granted.

Josh Angrist, Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 21 May 2015

Economic scholarship has changed dramatically in the past half-century, becoming far more empirical and much less abstract and theoretical. The winds of change have blown most strongly in applied microeconomics, but econometrics has been left far behind. This column argues that econometrics teaching needs an overhaul and that this change has to start with better textbooks.

Timothy J. Sturgeon, 20 May 2015

With global value chains that fragment production across the world, national statistics fail to capture the growing interconnectedness of economies. This column describes the international input-output tables that allow researchers to estimate the share of a country’s export value derived from imported inputs. However, while these tools offer promising uses, at the moment statistics on trade in value added should be treated with great caution.

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