Mental illness: The great hidden problem in today's society

Richard Layard interviewed by Viv Davies,

Date Published

Wed, 10/15/2014

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See Also

Layard, R and D M Clark (2014), Thrive: The power of evidence-based psychological therapies, London: Penguin (Available at Amazon).

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Topics

Health economics
Tags
mental illness, health costs

Date Weighting

1

Related Article(s)

Psychological therapy costs nothing Are fruit and vegetables good for your mental health as well as your physical health? The long-lasting effects of public-health interventions Cannabis use and mental health problems
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September 2014

Why more psychological therapy would cost nothing

Richard Layard, David M. Clark 17 July 2014

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In rich countries, 38% of all illness is mental illness.1 It particularly affects people of working age where it accounts for 50% of the total (see Fig 1). The overall economic cost has been estimated at 8% of GDP, not to mention the massive suffering involved. Policymakers increasingly wonder what they can do about it.

Figure 1. Mental illness is the main health problem of working age in rich countries.

 

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Topics:  Health economics

Tags:  mental illness, health costs

Are fruit and vegetables good for your mental health as well as your physical health?

Sarah Stewart-Brown 11 November 2012

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Public health policy has an enormous impact on national wellbeing (Delaney, Smith and McGovern 2011). A study recently published in Social Indicators Research (Blanchflower, Oswald and Stewart-Brown 2012) investigated the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and mental health. The study drew upon three robust, representative, cross-sectional studies of random samples of adults in three UK countries; England, Scotland, and Wales. Each of these surveys gathered self-reported intake data, measured in portions of fruit and vegetables of up to eight or more a day.

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Topics:  Health economics

Tags:  health, Mental health, diet, mental illness