The who and how of disappearing routine jobs

Matias Cortes, Nir Jaimovich, Christopher J. Nekarda, Henry Siu 02 October 2014

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Labour markets around the world have experienced a profound polarisation in recent decades. The share of employment in middle-wage jobs has declined, while employment in high- and low-wage jobs has increased. In the US, this ‘hollowing out of the middle’ has been linked to declining per-capita employment in occupations with a high content of routine tasks – activities that can be performed by following a well-defined set of procedures and are therefore relatively easy to automate (Autor et al. 2006, Goos et al. 2014).

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  labour market polarisation, routine and non-routine tasks, cognitive and non-cognitive tasks

Job polarisation and the decline of middle-class workers’ wages

Michael Boehm 08 February 2014

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The decline of the middle class has come to the forefront of debate in the US and Europe in recent years. This decline has two important components in the labour market. First, the number of well-paid middle-skill jobs in manufacturing and clerical occupations has decreased substantially since the mid-1980s. Second, the relative earnings for workers around the median of the wage distribution dropped over the same period, leaving them with hardly any real wage gains in nearly 30 years.

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Topics:  Labour markets Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  jobs, middle class, labour, routine and non-routine tasks

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