Walking wounded: The British economy in the aftermath of World War I

Nicholas Crafts 27 August 2014

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World War I was not over by Christmas of 1914. It was a prolonged, brutal, and expensive conflict.  Britain incurred 715,000 military deaths (with more than twice that number wounded), the destruction of 3.6% of its human capital, 10% of its domestic and 24% of its overseas assets, and spent well over 25% of its GDP on the war effort between 1915 and 1918 (Broadberry and Harrison, 2005).  Yet that was far from the sum of the losses that the Great War inflicted on the British economy; economic damage continued to accrue throughout the 1920s and beyond. 

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Topics:  Economic history

Tags:  World War I, unemployment

Short poppies: The height of World War I servicemen

Timothy J Hatton 09 May 2014

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The last century has seen unprecedented increases in the heights of adults (Bleakley et al., 2013). Among young men in western Europe, that increase amounts to about four inches. On average, sons have been taller than their fathers for the last five generations. These gains in height are linked to improvements in health and longevity.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Health economics

Tags:  Height, socioeconomic conditions, World War I

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