Education

Adriana Kugler, Maurice Kugler, Juan Saavedra, Luis Herrera, 28 January 2016

Vocational training programmes offer a second chance to those who drop out of the formal education system. Most studies of the success of such programmes, however, typically only analyse outcomes directly after participation. This column examines the medium- and long-term outcomes of a vocational training programme in Colombia. Results suggest that vocational training and formal education are complementary investments and that there are educational spillover effects for family members, in particular among applicants with high baseline educational attainment.

Ghazala Azmat, Caterina Calsamiglia, Nagore Iriberri, 22 January 2016

Not everyone responds to pressure in the same way. This column suggests that girls and boys respond differently to the pressure of exams, depending on the significance of the exams. Girls perform relatively better when the stakes are low, but boys outperform them when the stakes are very high. This has a number of implications for the choices that young men and women make over degree subjects and careers.

Sneha Elango, Jorge Luis García, James J. Heckman, Andrés Hojman, 12 January 2016

Adverse early childhood environments can have persistent effects. This column suggests that early childhood programmes have many beneficial effects, and their success should be evaluated on a multitude of outcomes. The returns to investing in the early lives of disadvantaged children in terms of social mobility and economic productivity are high – comparable to returns on equity investment.

Esperanza Vera-Toscano, Sjoerd Hardeman, 06 January 2016

Education is considered to be of key importance to economic growth, jobs, and development. This column argues that higher education is not a deterministic factor driving economic performance in itself. Rather it is the skills acquired through education that drive economic development. Policymakers should take into account a range of different indicators to make a proper judgement about where education is heading and how to improve it.

Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, 22 September 2015

A number of countries have implemented various policies in an attempt to boost the performance of state-maintained schools. This column looks at the latest of these – the academies programme in England. Compared with reforms in other countries, the scale and pace of the academies programme is unprecedented. So far, academy attendance has led to gains in achievement, and the increase in autonomy has enabled schools to boost performance. It is too early, however, to tell whether the early success of sponsored academies will translate into success for the wider programme.

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