30 June - 2 July 2016 / Florence / Florence School of Banking and Finance, European University Institute

Banking is one of the most complex areas of modern economies. Flawed understanding, mismanagement, and bad regulation of banks have caused the Great Financial Crisis of 2007-2010 and the worst economic crisis in Europe in decades. This course will shed some light on the theory of banking and recent empirical insights into the functioning of banks. Starting from a thorough discussion of basic conceptual frameworks it will discuss elements of shadow banking, financial stability, and bank regulation.

The course provides an introduction to the conceptual foundations of banking and explores the workings of banks in modern economies, by looking at problems of credit intermediation, liquidity provision, maturity transformation, relationship lending, and bank competition.

7 - 9 September 2016 / Florence / Florence School of Banking and Finance, European University Institute

The objective of this course is to present empirical applications (as well as the research methodologies) of relevant questions for both banking theory and policy, mainly related to Systemic Risk, Crises, Monetary Policy and Risk taking behaviour. An important objective is to understand scientific papers in empirical banking; to accomplish this objective, emphasis is placed on illustrating research methodologies used in empirical banking and learning the application of these methodologies to selected topics, such as:

- Securities and credit registers; large datasets

- Fire sales, runs, market and funding liquidity, systemic risk

- Risk-taking and credit channels of monetary policy

- Moral hazard vs. behavioral based risk-taking

- Secular stagnation, banking and debt crises

- Interbank globalization, contagion, emerging markets, policy

5 - 6 October 2016 / Florence / Florence School of banking and Finance, European University Institute

The training will touch upon the technical framework for contingent capital and bail in debt and the different choices made by the European legislator as compared to other regulators throughout the world. A comparison is made of different bail in regimes in Europe as well, in order to explore the common ground and the differences in the applicable regimes. In addition to the analysis from a legal perspective, an elaborate discussion will be presented about the first market developments in respect of contingent capital and bail in debt, effects on pricing and the different rationale for investors taking positions in contingent capital and bail in debt.

2 - 4 November 2016 / Florence / Florence School of Banking and Finance, European University Institute

The course will consider alternative macroeconomic frameworks with financial frictions to under-stand financial crisis, business cycles and public policy. There will be an brief historical overview of financial crises and basic financial accelerator models which emphasizes the interaction between borrowing constraint, asset price and aggregate production.

It will then be introduced liquidity constraint to examine the business cycles and monetary policy. Finally, the course will present financial intermediaries and government to study banking crisis, credit policy and macro prudential policy. By developing these frameworks, the training aims to understand the recent financial crisis and the roles of public policies.

Events