Agglomeration and product innovation in China

Hongyong Zhang 21 July 2014

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Spatial agglomeration of economic activities is generally assumed to improve productivity and spur firms’ innovation through localisation economies and urbanisation economies.1 There is an extensive empirical literature investigating the effects of localisation and urbanisation on firm-level productivity. Despite its economic importance, there are few empirical studies focusing on agglomeration and product innovation. Feldman and Audretsch (1999) and De Beule and Van Beveren (2010) are two of the few exceptions.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, productivity, China, spatial concentration, innovation, subsidies, clusters, agglomeration

Protection of intellectual property to foster innovations in the service sector

Masayuki Morikawa 20 July 2014

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Given the declining labour force due to population ageing, accelerating the productivity growth of industries – especially the service industries – is an important element of the growth strategy in Japan and most advanced countries. While there are a variety of factors affecting productivity, innovation is one of the key determinants of productivity growth. However, innovation in the service sector has not been studied well. I present findings on innovation in the service sector by focusing on the effect of intellectual property rights on innovation.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, growth, productivity, patents, Japan, innovation, services, intellectual property, trade secrets

R&D internationalisation during the Global Crisis

Bernhard Dachs, Georg Zahradnik 06 July 2014

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Foreign firms’ share of total business R&D expenditure increased during the last three decades in almost all countries where data is available, but this trend stopped with the Global Crisis of 2008–2009. In most countries, R&D of foreign firms was more severely affected by the crisis than R&D of domestic firms. However, the crisis did not lead to a new global distribution of overseas R&D expenditure.

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Topics:  Global crisis Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, globalisation, multinationals, FDI, innovation, global crisis, persistence, autonomy, subsidiaries

DynEmp: New cross-country evidence on the role of young firms in job creation, growth, and innovation

Chiara Criscuolo, Peter N. Gal, Carlo Menon 26 May 2014

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Since well before the crisis, many OECD economies have been confronted with sluggish productivity growth. In the aftermath of the crisis, job creation has also stalled and has become an important policy issue. Business dynamics are at the core of the creative destruction process. Available evidence points to significant cross-country heterogeneity in the dynamism of businesses, even after taking into account differences in sectoral composition. This raises policymakers’ interest in understanding the role of framework conditions in this area.

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Topics:  Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, employment, growth, OECD, job creation, business cycles, firms, start-ups

US university science: The shopping mall model

Paula Stephan 20 March 2014

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Universities have relied heavily on federal funds for research for many years. Yet, since 2005, federal funds have been flat in real terms, with the exception of funds received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). More importantly, the hope for a substantial increase in federal funds is dim.

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Topics:  Education Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, Universities, external funding

The economic impact of inward FDI on the US

Theodore H. Moran, Lindsay Oldenski 04 March 2014

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The US is the second-largest recipient of FDI in the world, behind China, and by far the largest target for FDI among OECD countries (OECD 2013). The numbers are large ($253 billion for the US), and the gap with the next-largest in the OECD is impressive ($63 billion for the UK and $62 billion for France in 2012).

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, US, productivity, wages, multinationals, FDI, spillovers

Nuclear expansion or phase-out? Costs and opportunities

Enrica De Cian, Samuel Carrara, Massimo Tavoni 22 December 2013

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"We learned from Fukushima that we have to deal differently with risks… We believe we as a country can be a trailblazer for a new age of renewable energy sources… We can be the first major industrialized country that achieves the transition to renewable energy with all the opportunities – for exports, development, technology, jobs – it carries with it.” Angela Merkel (distinct quotes).

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Topics:  Energy Environment

Tags:  R&D, energy, climate change, environment, climate policy, carbon pricing, energy mix, nuclear power

Do multinationals that expand abroad invest less at home?

Theodore H. Moran, Lindsay Oldenski 31 October 2013

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There is a long history of politicians accusing US MNCs of “shipping jobs overseas” when they invest outside the US. President Obama, for example, has proposed special support for US firms that stay at home, and criticised those that move abroad (State of the Union speech 2012). This line of attack implicitly assumes that expansion abroad by US firms substitutes for domestic expansion, harming US workers. It is equally possible that foreign expansion increases the productivity and market share of firms in a way that benefits US workers.

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Topics:  Industrial organisation International trade

Tags:  R&D, multinationals

Offshoring and its effects on innovation in emerging economies

Ursula Fritsch, Holger Görg 23 September 2013

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Most empirical studies of the impact of outsourcing on firms look at industrialised countries. However, outsourcing is also common in emerging economies, and firms in middle-income countries split up their production processes similarly to firms in developed countries (see figures in Miroudot et al. (2009) on trade in intermediates). Recent research analyses the benefits to firms from outsourcing, focusing mainly on productivity and innovation effects. The latter are particularly important, since innovation is a key determinant of productivity improvements and – ultimately – growth.

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Topics:  International trade Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, offshoring, innovation, international trade, emerging markets, outsourcing, technology transfer

Does offshoring hurt domestic innovation activities?

Bernhard Dachs, Bernd Ebersberger, Steffen Kinkel, Oliver Som 07 September 2013

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Offshoring of production activities has been a topic of economic policy debates for at least the last decade. A central issue in these debates are the economic effects of offshoring on firms in the home country. Most contributions investigated the effects of offshoring on output, employment or skills (see the surveys of Lipsey 2002, Olsen 2006, Crinò 2009) and find a complementary relationship between foreign and domestic economic activity, at least in the long run.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, Labour Markets, offshoring

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