External integration, structural transformation, and economic development: Evidence from Argentina 1870-1914

Pablo Fajgelbaum, Stephen Redding, 12 July 2014

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External economic integration is often argued to be an important driver of economic development, as it raises income through specialisation in comparative-advantage sectors, provides low-cost access to imported goods, and shapes the pattern of structural transformation from agricultural into non-agricultural activities.

Topics: Development, Economic history, International trade
Tags: Argentina, comparative advantage, integration, specialisation, trade costs

Gross trade accounting: A transparent method to discover global value chain-related information behind official trade data: Part 2

Zhi Wang, Shang-Jin Wei, Kunfu Zhu, 16 April 2014

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Analytical background

Topics: International trade
Tags: comparative advantage, competitiveness, global supply chain, global value chains, globalisation, statistics, trade

Offshoring and middle-income workers in the US

Lindsay Oldenski, 16 October 2012

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As the US presidential election approaches, both candidates have been focusing on the state of the middle class. In the first presidential debate, Mitt Romney claimed: "the people who are having the hard time right now are middle income Americans. Under the president's policies, middle income Americans have been buried".

Topics: International trade
Tags: comparative advantage, offshoring, polarisation

Can China’s growth lower welfare in developed countries? A refutation of the Samuelson conjecture

Julian di Giovanni, Andrei Levchenko, Jing Zhang, 2 April 2012

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Topics: Global economy, International trade
Tags: China, comparative advantage

Can services be the next growth escalator?

Ejaz Ghani, Arti Grover Goswami, Homi Kharas, 12 December 2011

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The world is experiencing a third industrial revolution with services trade being at the forefront of this revolution. Services are characterised by growing tradeability, increasing technological sophistication, and lower transport costs.

Topics: Development, International trade, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: comparative advantage, PRODY, Services sector, Services trade, technological change

Development and accumulation of new capabilities: The Index of Opportunities

Jesus Felipe, Utsav Kumar, Arnelyn Abdon, 22 July 2010

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Development is about structural transformation. This can be defined as the process by which countries change what they produce and how they do it. It involves a shift in the output and employment structures away move from low-productivity and low-wage activities into high-productivity and high-wage activities; and the upgrading and diversification of the production and export baskets.

Topics: Development, International trade
Tags: comparative advantage, development, growth, international trade, structural adjustment

Why large American gains from globalisation are plausible

Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Matthew Adler, 24 July 2008

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The Peterson Institute calculates that the US economy was approximately $1 trillion richer in 2003 due to past globalisation – the payoff both from technological innovation and from policy liberalisation – and could gain another $500 billion annually from future policy liberalisation (Bradford, Grieco, and Hufbauer 2005).

Topics: Global economy, International trade
Tags: comparative advantage, economies of scale, globalisation, monopolistic competition, partial equilibrium, productivity gains, safety net, US economy

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