Forward guidance in the UK

Spencer Dale, James Talbot 13 September 2013

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At its meeting on 1 August 2013, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) agreed to provide state-contingent forward guidance concerning the future conduct of monetary policy. The aim was to provide more information to help financial markets, households and businesses understand the conditions under which the current stance of monetary policy would be maintained.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, Central Banks, Bank of England, forward guidance

How to jumpstart the Eurozone economy

Francesco Giavazzi, Guido Tabellini 21 August 2014

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The mantra is that once again it is up to the ECB to save the Eurozone. Quantitative easing is the last policy tool available to jumpstart the Eurozone economy. The longer the ECB waits before starting to buy government bonds, the further away will the recovery be. This analysis, however, overestimates the power of monetary policy.

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  ECB, monetary policy, fiscal policy, quantitative easing, public debt, aggregate demand, Eurozone economy, stagnation

Identifying and quantifying monetary policy transmission through bank balance sheets

Kaoru Hosono, Daisuke Miyakawa 09 August 2014

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How does monetary policy affect firm activities? While there is long-standing literature on this issue, the transmission mechanism of monetary policy is currently attracting renewed attention. The reason is that many central banks – including the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the ECB, and the Bank of Japan – have introduced unconventional monetary policies such as quantitative easing and credit easing in the wake of the Global Crisis, and sooner or later will have to exit from these policies.

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Topics:  Financial markets Global crisis Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, Japan, global crisis, quantitative easing, unconventional monetary policy, balance sheets, financial accelerator, credit easing, bank lending channel

Will the US inflate away its public debt?

Ricardo Reis, Jens Hilscher, Alon Raviv 07 August 2014

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Should the US Federal Reserve raise the inflation target from its current level of 2%? And will it? One benefit would be to make hitting the zero lower bound less likely, which would lead to less severe recessions, as Olivier Blanchard, Giovanni Dell’Ariccia, and Paolo Mauro (2010), Daniel Leigh (2010), and Laurence Ball (2013) have argued on this website.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  inflation, monetary policy, public debt, seignorage

Revisiting the pain in Spain

Paul De Grauwe 07 July 2014

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The different macroeconomic adjustment dynamics in Spain – a member of a monetary union – and the UK – a stand-alone country – is stark. Paul Krugman popularised this contrast in his New York Times blog with the title “The Pain in Spain” (Krugman 2009, 2011), and commented on my own analysis in De Grauwe (2011).

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Global crisis Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  ECB, monetary policy, euro, EMU, Spain, monetary union, fiscal policy, UK, government debt, austerity, EZ crisis, Outright Monetary Transactions, currency depreciation

Monetary policy without interest rates: Evidence from France (1948 to 1973) using a narrative approach

Eric Monnet 05 July 2014

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Recent central bank interventions following the Global Crisis have raised new interest in quantitative measures as instruments of monetary or macroprudential policy (Borio 2011, Galati and Moessner 2013). In fact, quantitative controls – especially credit controls – have been used as primary tools of monetary policy for decades in western Europe and east Asia, usually during periods when these countries were experiencing their highest ever rates of growth. Many countries, including Brazil, India, and China, still use them today.

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Monetary policy

Tags:  France, monetary policy, credit controls

Low interest rates and secular stagnation: Is debt a missing link?

Claudio Borio, Piti Disyatat 25 June 2014

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Today, the US government can borrow for ten years at a fixed rate of around 2.5%. Adjusted for expected inflation, this translates into a real borrowing cost of under 0.5%. A year ago, real rates were actually negative. With low interest rates dominating the developed world, many worry that an era of secular stagnation has begun (Summers 2013).

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Topics:  Financial markets Global crisis Monetary policy

Tags:  interest rates, monetary policy, global crisis, debt, secular stagnation, risk-taking channel of monetary policy, natural rate of interest, monetary non-neutrality

Repairing the transmission of monetary policy through asset-backed securitisation

Markus K Brunnermeier, Yuliy Sannikov 03 June 2014

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Recent data show a decline in credit to small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) and private loans. Lack of credit growth to productive firms is one of the main obstacles to reignite the European growth engine.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, price stability, financial stability, securitisation, risk premia, asset backed securities

ECB: An appropriate monetary policy

Mickey Levy 16 May 2014

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Europe’s modest economic recovery and uncomfortably low inflation put the ECB in a bind. Although economic conditions are improving gradually (European Commission 2014), concerns about the potentially negative impacts of deflation persist (Armstrong et al. 2014). The ECB’s top near-term priorities are to avoid deflation (and apparently even sustained low inflation) and extend the economic recovery.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  ECB, eurozone, monetary policy, quantitative easing, bank lending

Why monetary policy matters: New UK narrative evidence

James Cloyne, Patrick Hürtgen 15 May 2014

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In recent decades, central banks around the world have predominantly used interest rates as their main monetary policy instrument. And while the zero lower bound has necessitated a range of unconventional monetary policies, many central banks clearly still intend to use interest rates as their preferred tool as their economies recover. A range of empirical estimates have emerged from the academic literature over several decades putting the effect on prices and output of a one percentage point increase in interest rates between 0.5% and 1%.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, UK, interest rates changes

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