Who is to blame for the credit crunch: foreign ownership or foreign funding?

Erik Feyen, Raquel Letelier, Inessa Love, Samuel Munzele Maimbo, Roberto Rocha, 15 March 2014

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From boom to crunch

Although most developing countries around the world experienced a severe contraction of bank credit during the recent global financial crisis, the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (ECA) region was disproportionately hit after it had experienced very high credit growth (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Banking system trends in ECA

Topics: Financial markets, Global crisis, International finance
Tags: banking, Central Asia, Credit crunch, credit growth, cross-border banking, Eastern Europe, global financial crisis

Remittances and vulnerability in developing countries: Results from a new dataset on remittances from Italy

Giulia Bettin, Andrea F Presbitero, Nikola Spatafora, 10 February 2014

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Remittances from migrant workers currently represent one of the most important financial flows to developing countries. They can play an important role in pulling millions of families out of poverty. It is therefore critical to identify the key factors affecting remittances, as well as the barriers to these flows (Beck and Martinez Peria 2009 ).

Topics: Development, Migration
Tags: financial development, global financial crisis, Italy, migration, Remittances

Tracking the causes of Eurozone external imbalances: New evidence

Jose Luis Diaz Sanchez, Aristomene Varoudakis, 6 February 2014

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The Eurozone sovereign debt crisis, triggered by the 2008–09 global financial crisis, exposed macroeconomic imbalances in member countries that had accrued gradually following the advent of the euro in 1999.

Topics: International finance
Tags: competitiveness, European sovereign debt crisis, eurozone, global financial crisis, global imbalances

Turmoil in emerging markets: What’s missing from the story?

Kristin Forbes, 5 February 2014

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Emerging markets are going through another period of volatility – and the most popular boogeyman is the US Federal Reserve.

Topics: International finance
Tags: capital flows, emerging markets, Federal Reserve, global financial crisis, tapering

How did the Global Financial Crisis misalign East Asian currencies?

Eiji Ogawa, Zhiqian Wang, 19 January 2014

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Some East Asian countries experienced a serious currency crisis in 1997. The crisis was blamed on both the de facto US dollar peg system and double mismatches of domestic financial institutions’ balance sheets in terms of currency and maturity. Following the Asian currency crisis, recognition of the importance of regional monetary cooperation has steadily grown.

Topics: Exchange rates, International finance
Tags: currency crisis, East Asian financial crisis, exchange rates, financial crisis, global financial crisis

Why fiscal sustainability matters

Willem Buiter, 10 January 2014

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Does fiscal sustainability matter only when there is a fiscal house on fire, as was the case with the Greek sovereign insolvency in 2011–12? Far from it.

Topics: Financial markets, Global crisis, International finance, Macroeconomic policy
Tags: balance-sheet recession, banking, banking union, banks, capital flows, credit booms, Currency wars, emerging markets, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, financial crisis, fiscal policy, fiscal sustainability, global financial crisis, sovereign debt, sovereign debt restructuring

The next sudden stop

Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 7 January 2014

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The ominous facts are well known – the strongest predictors of financial crises are domestic credit booms and external debts (Reinhart and Rogoff 2011). In emerging markets, credit booms are generally preceded by large capital inflows (Reinhart and Reinhart 2010).

Topics: Financial markets, International finance
Tags: capital flows, emerging markets, global financial crisis, liability dollarisation, sudden stops, tapering, Turkey

Policymaking in crises: Pick your poison

Kristin Forbes, Michael W Klein, 24 December 2013

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In 2010, the Brazilian finance minister Guido Mantenga declared a ‘currency war’ because of the harmful effects of the strengthening of the real. He blamed the currency’s appreciation on easy money in advanced countries, and to a lesser extent on reserve accumulation in some emerging markets.

Topics: Exchange rates, Macroeconomic policy
Tags: Brazil, capital controls, currency war, exchange rates, foreign exchange reserves, global financial crisis, India, Indonesia

Single supervision and resolution rules: Is ECB independence at risk?

Donato Masciandaro, Francesco Passarelli, 21 December 2013

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A successful transition to a European Banking Union requires robust and credible ‘Chinese walls’ between the ECB’s role as monetary authority and any responsibility in the Single Supervisory Mechanism or in the resolution rules. Otherwise, the ECB’s independence would be at risk, given that monetary policy would likely have larger distributional effects.

Topics: EU institutions, Financial markets
Tags: bank resolution, banking regulation, banking union, central bank independence, Central Banks, ECB, global financial crisis

Global financial crisis: What policy responses do markets favour?

Yacine Aït-Sahalia, Jochen Andritzky, Andreas Jobst , Sylwia Nowak, Natalia Tamirisa, 10 December 2009

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The debate on policy responses to the crisis has been unfolding in real time. John Taylor and John Williams (2009) questioned the use of liquidity support in reducing financial distress. It has been argued on this site that a coordinated recapitalisation programme was essential to stabilise the global financial system (see Baldwin and Eichengreen 2008).

Topics: Financial markets, Global crisis
Tags: ad-hoc policies, global financial crisis, liquidity risk premia, strategy

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