Chris Forman, Avi Goldfarb, Shane Greenstein, Friday, May 23, 2014 - 00:00

The diffusion of the internet has had varying effects on the location of economic activity, leading to both increases and decreases in geographic concentration. This column presents evidence that the internet worked against increasing concentration in invention. This relationship is particularly strong for inventions with more than one inventor, and when inventors live in different cities.

Hiroyasu Inoue, Kentaro Nakajima, Yukiko Umeno Saito, Friday, October 25, 2013 - 00:00

Distance matters – in trade, and in knowledge creation. Policies encouraging industrial clustering rely on this notion. This column presents evidence that geographic distance is a significant impediment to inter-establishment research relationships in Japan. This friction persists over decades, suggesting that advances in communication technology are no substitute for face-to-face interaction.

Ernesto Talvi, Ignacio Munyo, Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 00:00

The global crisis crippled advanced economies, but it also freed up financial resources that flooded emerging markets. This column introduces an index to identify the post-crisis winners and losers, digging into the causes of the new economic geography and exploring the vulnerability of emerging economies to a recurrence of a Lehman-type virus.

Sergey Lychagin, John Van Reenen, Margaret E Slade, Joris Pinkse, Monday, October 25, 2010 - 00:00

Why do local policymakers fight so hard to attract research and development labs to their area? This column provides a possible explanation. Using patent data, it finds a strong link between R&D and growth caused by knowledge spillovers between firms.

Jota Ishikawa, Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 00:00

This column reflects on the Nobel Prize awarded to Paul Krugman, whose solo win surprised some. It comments on the relevance of Krugman’s contributions to new trade theory and new economic geography. The latter have been of particular interest to European economists.

Marius Brülhart, Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 00:00

Paul Krugman suggests that his Nobel-prize-winning “core-periphery” model was perhaps more relevant a century ago than today. This appears to be true in terms of overall manufacturing concentrations in Europe and North America, which are unravelling. Large-scale agglomeration forces, however, are alive and well in the developing world, as are localised sectoral clustering phenomena in industrialised countries.

Pierre-Philippe Combes, Miren Lafourcade, Jacques-François Thisse, Jean-Claude Toutain, Friday, December 5, 2008 - 00:00

This column traces the economic evolution of France’s regions over the last 140 years to test the predictions of new economy geography. Both manufacturing and services experienced a bell-shaped curve of spatial development, in which spatial concentration initially increased and then decreased. While transport costs played a key role, positive spillovers are an increasingly important source of agglomeration gains.

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