Has China’s new labour contract law worked?

Richard B. Freeman, Xiaoying Li 22 December 2013

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In 2007 China enacted a new Labour Contract Law (LCL) – the first major labour reform in over a decade. The law sought to pressure firms to give workers written contracts that would help workers enforce their legal rights at the workplace. Because local governments put economic growth and business interests above worker well-being, implementation of labour laws in China has historically been weak (Tang 2008) with the result that many workers in China suffered ill treatment by employers (Lee 2007, Chan 2001).

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  China, labour contracts

Growing like China: understanding the puzzle of China's economic transition

Fabrizio Zilibotti interviewed by Viv Davies,

Date Published

Mon, 12/23/2013

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See Also

Announcement on CEPR website: CEPR Fellows receive the Sun Yefang 2012 Award (Tuesday, September 10, 2013).

Growing Like China” by Zheng Song, Kjetil Storesletten and Fabrizio Zilibotti (2013).

 

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Topics

Poverty and income inequality Productivity and Innovation
Tags
productivity, China, Inequality

Related Article(s)

Agglomeration and exports Inequality in China Chinese competition policy Technology transfer for Chinese markets
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September 2013

Housing, spatial price differences, and inequality in China

John Gibson, Chao Li 27 November 2013

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How do others measure inequality in China?

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Topics:  Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  China, Inequality, spatial price differences, costs of living

Does policy uncertainty reduce economic activity? Insights and evidence from large trade reforms

Kyle Handley, Nuno Limão 23 November 2013

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The impact of policy uncertainty on economic activity is an issue traditionally associated with developing countries. Since 2008, however, the spotlight has shifted. Governments’ responses to the Great Recession and the Eurozone crisis have raised considerable uncertainty about the future policies of advanced economies. Examples include the timing and size of financial bailouts, government expenditures, and the risk of sovereign-debt default. These crises have also heightened trade policy uncertainty.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  US, China, WTO, trade, uncertainty, Great Recession, Eurozone crisis

The dragon awakes: Is Chinese competition policy a cause for concern?

Mario Mariniello 09 November 2013

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Foreign businesses are increasingly realising that China has antitrust laws, and is not shy about using them. The Glencore/Xstrata merger in the spring was cleared only with conditions imposed by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce. In August, the Chinese National Development and Reform Commission imposed a record €82 million fine on milk powder producers for a price-fixing conspiracy. The Chinese authorities are also taking more decisions.

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Topics:  Competition policy

Tags:  China, international trade, protectionism, Competition policy, antitrust

Quid pro quo: Technology capital transfers for market access in China

Thomas Holmes, Ellen McGrattan, Edward C. Prescott 08 November 2013

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Over the past two decades China’s economy has grown rapidly and the nation has become a major destination for foreign direct investment. Surprisingly, little of China's FDI inflows come from technologically advanced, dominant players in global investment such as the US, Europe, and Japan (Prasad and Wei 2007, Branstetter and Foley 2010). Moreover, while there has been an explosion of patenting in China by domestic applicants, FDI outflows from China to the US, Europe, and Japan remain small.

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Topics:  Global economy International trade

Tags:  China, patents, FDI, intellectual property rights

The BRICs party is over

Anders Åslund 04 September 2013

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After a decade of infatuation, investors have suddenly turned their backs on emerging markets. In the BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China – growth rates have quickly fallen and current-account balances have deteriorated.1 The surprise is not that the romance is over but that it could have lasted for so long.

From 2000 to 2008 the world went through one of the greatest commodity and credit booms of all times. Goldman Sachs preached that the BRICs were unstoppable (e.g. Wilson and Purushothaman 2003).

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Topics:  Development International trade

Tags:  Russia, China, India, commodities, protectionism, BRICs, Brazil, BRIC

Informal or formal financing: First evidence on co-funding of Chinese firms

Hans Degryse, Liping Lu, Steven Ongena 21 August 2013

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The credit squeeze in June 2013 has triggered policymakers’ concern worldwide about a potential debt crisis in China, while at the same time the Chinese government has moved to crack down on undisciplined lending in order to alleviate the debt-bubble fears emanating from the shadow banking system.1 

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Topics:  Development Financial markets

Tags:  China, investment, Finance

Who becomes a top politician in China?

Ruixue Jia, Masa Kudamatsu, David Seim 20 August 2013

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In November 2012, China saw a new team of national political leaders assume office with Xi Jinping at the helm as the general secretary of the Communist Party. Earlier in the same year, Bo Xilai, who had been considered to be a promising candidate for the upcoming new political leadership, was expelled from the Party.

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Topics:  Development Politics and economics

Tags:  China

Protectionist clouds darken sunny forecast for solar power

Jeffrey Frankel 07 August 2013

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On 27 July negotiators reached a compromise settlement in the world’s largest anti-dumping dispute, regarding Chinese exports of solar panels to the EU. China agreed to constrain its exports to a minimum price and a maximum quantity. The solution is restrictive relative to the six-year trend of rapidly increasing Chinese market share (which had reached 80% in Europe), and plummeting prices.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  US, China, EU, dumping

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