Geography and offshoring to China

Alyson C Ma, Ari Van Assche, 18 May 2011

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Anecdotal evidence is rife with tales of multinational firms that have offshored their production to China, stoking fears that it is leading to a hollowing-out of manufacturing around the world.

Topics: International trade
Tags: China, offshoring

Why are reserves so big?

Uri Dadush, Bennett Stancil, 9 May 2011

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Foreign-exchange reserves play a crucial role in macroeconomic management. They provide a safety net during times of economic turmoil and, for most developing countries, a means to peg the nominal exchange rate. They also provide a means to manage windfalls from commodity exports or from sudden surges of capital.

Topics: Global governance
Tags: China, exchange-rate policy, global imbalances, Japan, US

What to do about Doha

Anne Krueger, 28 April 2011

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In an ideal world, the Doha Round would have been completed by now.

Since it has not been, the best outcome now would be to have a strong agreement that could quickly be negotiated, especially enhancing the agreements on the liberalisation of services and agriculture.

Topics: International trade
Tags: Brazil, China, Doha Round, global governance, India, US

Asia Pacific and the Doha Round

Muhammad Chatib Basri, 28 April 2011

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Of many benefits of the Doha Round for the Asia Pacific economies, one is fostering their reform process and taking advantage of new market access.

Asia Pacific economies (many of them classified as emerging economies) have an enormous stake in the Doha Round.

Topics: International trade
Tags: Asia, China, Doha Round, Indonesia, Pacific

Doha Round: Or else what?

Philip Levy, 28 April 2011

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The state of the current round of global trade talks is indisputably dire. It is never a good sign when analysts are quibbling over whether Doha is dead or simply comatose. Despite plaintive, increasingly desperate cries from Geneva, leaders of the G20 countries have shown little inclination to follow through on their repeated commitments to conclude the talks.

Topics: International trade
Tags: Brazil, China, Doha Round, G20, India, US

Why Doha Round matters to Asia and the Pacific

Peter Drysdale, 7 May 2011

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Editor's Note: This column first appeared in last week's VoxEU eBook Why World Leaders Must Resist the False Promise of a Doha Delay.

So what's the problem? Does it matter if the WTO’s Doha Round is prematurely pronounced dead?

Topics: International trade
Tags: Asia, China, Doha Round, Pacifica

How the iPhone widens the US trade deficit with China

Yuqing Xing, 10 April 2011

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At the centre of global imbalances is the bilateral trade imbalance between China and the US. Most attention to date has been focused on macro factors and China’s exchange-rate regime.

Topics: Exchange rates, International trade
Tags: China, exchange-rate policy, global imbalances, iPhone, US

Have Chinese innovators (and banks) finally grown-up?

Aoife Hanley, Wan-Hsin Liu, Andrea Vaona, 24 March 2011

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There is a wind of change in China. Chinese policymakers have become more ambitious. They are now aspiring for innovation leadership status (OECD 2008; World Bank Report 2009). For this to happen, Chinese firms and universities are encouraged to work harder at developing their own R&D capability and to wean themselves off imported technologies.

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: China, foreign direct investment, innovation

US monetary policy and the saving glut

Heleen Mees, 24 March 2011

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At the Paris G20 meeting on 18 February 2011, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke squarely laid the blame for the financial crisis and ensuing economic crisis on global imbalances, or the so-called global saving glut (for a review of the arguments see Suominen 2010).

Topics: Global crisis, Monetary policy
Tags: China, global imbalances, monetary policy, US

Are the world’s megacities too big?

Klaus Desmet, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg , 12 March 2011

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The trend in urbanisation is continuing unabated across the globe. According to the UN, by 2025 close to 5 billion people will live in urbanised areas. Many cities, especially in the developing world, are set to explode in size.

Topics: Environment
Tags: China, megacities, urbanisation

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