Michael W Klein, Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 00:00

Capital controls are back in vogue. This column argues that we should distinguish between episodic controls (gates) and long-standing controls (walls). Research shows that the apparent success of 'walls' in China and India tells us little about the consequences of capital controls imposed or removed in countries like Brazil and South Korea, as circumstances change. Walls and gates are fundamentally distinct, and policy debate needs to take into account these differences.

Betty C. Daniel, Sunday, July 1, 2012 - 00:00

What causes financial crises in emerging markets? This column looks at the effect of risky investments in South Korea on the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s.

Pradumna B. Rana, Monday, June 25, 2012 - 00:00

China, Japan, and South Korea are currently negotiating a free trade agreement (FTA) lending support to the possibility of an agreement for the South-East Asian region as a whole. This column calls for more of the same – and quickly.

Moonsung Kang, Soonchan Park, Sunday, September 4, 2011 - 00:00

How have South Korean trade flows responded to the financial crisis of 2008-09? This column, part of a collection of four columns on trade responses to the crisis, finds that although relatively few antidumping duties were initiated, the Korea Trade Commission was more active in imposing these duties.

Helmut Reisen, Jean-Philippe Stijns, Tuesday, July 12, 2011 - 00:00

Many discussions of official development assistance express concerns about China's growing investment and involvement in Africa economies. This column, summarizing the 2011 African Economic Outlook report, emphasizes the benefits of emerging economies' increasing presence in Africa, including the opening of African policy space due to Western donors' decline in relative influence.

Kavaljit Singh, Monday, July 5, 2010 - 00:00

Despite recovering faster than developed countries, many emerging markets are struggling to cope with large capital inflows. This column discusses the recent capital controls imposed by Indonesia and South Korea. It argues that while the international community is warming to these policies, it would be wrong to view capital controls as a panacea.

Peter Debaere, Joon H. Lee , Hongshik Lee , Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 00:00

Do firms reduce their domestic employment when they establish operations abroad? Evidence from South Korean firms suggests that the impact varies by destination and operation. This column shows that concerns about investment in developing countries slowing employment growth at home may have empirical support.

CEPR Policy Research