How much unemployment insurance do we need?

Rafael Lalive, Camille Landais, Josef Zweimüller , 9 November 2013

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The global crisis that erupted in 2008 has put millions of workers out of a job. The US, for instance, experienced a dramatic increase in unemployment from around 4% to more than 10% during the Great Recession. Unemployment remained stubbornly high even when the economy began to recover.

Topics: Global crisis, Labour markets
Tags: search externalities, unemployment, Unemployment insurance

Unemployment, labour-market flexibility and IMF advice: Moving beyond mantras

Olivier Blanchard, Florence Jaumotte, Prakash Loungani, 18 October 2013

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Growth in advanced economies is gaining some speed. The IMF projects these economies will grow 2% next year, up from an expected 1.2% this year. The average unemployment rate in advanced economies is expected to inch down from its peak of 8.3% in 2010 to 8% next year. This is progress, but it is clearly not enough. The state of labour markets remains dismal for a number of reasons.

Topics: Labour markets, Welfare state and social Europe
Tags: collective bargaining, EZ crisis, IMF, institutions, labour-market flexibility, trust, unemployment, Unemployment insurance

Social job-search networks and the transition from school to stable employment

Francis Kramarz, Oskar Nordström Skans, 17 October 2013

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The challenges faced by young workers transitioning from school into stable employment are a major concern throughout the OECD. The search for stable employment is a time-consuming process, particularly in countries without highly developed apprenticeship systems. Many young workers – especially the least educated – are caught struggling for years.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: graduates, jobs, unemployment, youth unemployment

How the great recession affected unemployment of non-Western Immigrants in the Netherlands

Jan van Ours, 6 October 2013

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The labour-market position of immigrants in many European countries is weak – unemployment rates among immigrants are high, and employment rates are low (OECD 2011). There are various explanations for this. Immigrants often have lower educational attainment than natives, and fewer language skills. Furthermore, ethnic identity may be important.

Topics: Labour markets, Migration
Tags: Great Recession, migration, Netherlands, unemployment

German labour reforms: Unpopular success

Tom Krebs, Martin Scheffel, 20 September 2013

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Just a few years ago, Germany was known as the sick man of Europe (Burda 2007). Starting from an average unemployment rate below 4% in the 1970s, Germany saw its rate increase to almost 9% in the period 1995-2005. As seen in Figure 1 the unemployment rate has a strong cyclical component but also a trend component that has been rising since the 1970s until the mid-2000s.

Topics: Labour markets, Macroeconomic policy
Tags: Germany, reforms, unemployment

The downsizing dilemmas of European employers

Hendrik P van Dalen, Kène Henkens, 28 August 2013

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Drastic measures are taken when managers formulate strategies to survive economic crises. Among these are downsizing, outsourcing, firing workers and cutting back on wages. But how do firms balance their interests against those of their workers?

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: downsizing, Eurozone crisis, firing, hiring, unemployment

Accounting for the ethnic unemployment gap in France and the US

Laurent Gobillon, Peter Rupert, Étienne Wasmer, 23 July 2013

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The unemployment rate in France is roughly six percentage points higher for African immigrants than for natives. In the US, the unemployment rate is approximately nine percentage points higher for black people than for white people.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Labour markets
Tags: commuting, ethnicity, France, race, unemployment

High home ownership as a driver of high unemployment

Andrew J Oswald, 18 June 2013

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Unemployment matters. It is a major source of unhappiness, mental ill-health, and lost income. Yet after a century of economic research the determinants of unemployment are still imperfectly understood, and jobless levels in the industrialised nations are currently around 10%, with some over 20%.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: home ownership, unemployment

Job placement and displacement: Evidence from a randomised experiment

Bruno Crépon, Esther Duflo, Marc Gurgand, Roland Rathelot, Philippe Zamora, 24 April 2013

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Youth unemployment is a growing concern in many countries, including France where more than a quarter of recent graduates cannot find stable work. Some of these young graduates do not benefit from resources like unemployment benefits because they lack a sufficient employment history.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: Eurozone crisis, graduates, unemployment, youth unemployment

Budget balance, structural unemployment and fiscal adjustments: The Spanish case

Javier Andrés, Rafael Doménech, 5 April 2013

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One of the most important questions in the current process of fiscal consolidation in many developed economies concerns the size and the pace of the adjustment. An excessive and/or too-fast fiscal retrenchment can have dramatic effects on unemployment and growth, while if it is too slow, it can prove to be ineffective and lack credibility in the eyes of the financial markets.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions
Tags: Eurozone crisis, fiscal policy, Spain, structural adjustment, unemployment

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