The Chinese labour market: High unemployment coexisting with a labour shortage

Yang Liu, 19 July 2014

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In China, both a labour shortage and unemployment have emerged as problems in recent years. The number of university students scheduled to graduate in June 2014 is 7.27 million, increasing with 280,000 from 2013 (MHRSS 2014). Following 2013 – at the time considered the most difficult year for job seekers in history – 2014 is expected to be even harsher.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: China, labour shortage, unemployment

Globalisation, job security, and wages

Kerem Cosar, Nezih Guner, James R Tybout, 7 July 2014

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How does increased openness to international trade affect workers’ wages and job security? This question is central to the public debate concerning the effects of globalisation, but convincing quantitative answers have been difficult to come by. One fundamental reason is that major trade liberalisation episodes have often coincided with labour reforms (Heckman and Pages 2004).

Topics: International trade, Labour markets
Tags: Colombia, exports, globalisation, Inequality, job security, labour market reforms, productivity, trade liberalisation, unemployment, wages

The Great Recession’s long-term damage

Laurence Ball, 1 July 2014

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According to macroeconomics textbooks, a fall in aggregate demand causes a recession in which output drops below potential output – the normal level of production given the economy’s resources and technology. This effect is temporary, however.

Topics: Global crisis
Tags: Great Recession, growth, hysteresis, OECD, potential output, unemployment

The great British jobs and productivity mystery

João Paulo Pessoa, John Van Reenen, 28 June 2014

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With some economic recovery having finally got underway, the UK is still feeling the repercussions of the so-called ‘Great Recession’. National output, as measured by GDP, fell by over 7% from its peak in January 2008 – the biggest fall since the inter-war years – and only returned to its pre-crisis level in April 2014 (NIESR 2014).

Topics: Europe's nations and regions
Tags: Great Recession, productivity growth, UK, unemployment

Falling real wages in the UK

David Blanchflower, Stephen Machin, 12 May 2014

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There have been unprecedented falls in real wages in the UK since the start of the recession triggered by the financial crisis of 2008. This did not happen in previous economic downturns – median real wage growth slowed down or stalled, but it did not fall.

Topics: Labour markets, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: Great Recession, Inequality, real wages, UK, unemployment, US, wages

From sick man of Europe to economic superstar: Germany’s resurgence and the lessons for Europe

Christian Dustmann, Bernd Fitzenberger, Uta Schönberg, Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 3 February 2014

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In the late 1990s and into the early 2000s, Germany was called ‘the sick man of Europe’ (Bertram 1997). Today, Germany is Europe’s economic superstar.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: Hartz reforms, unemployment

Labour markets reforms and unemployment: Estimating the effects of wage moderation in the Spanish economy

Miguel Cardoso, Rafael Doménech, Juan Ramón García, Camilo A. Ulloa, 20 December 2013

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With its huge unemployment rate, if there is a country in need of assessment of labour markets reforms and wage moderation, it is Spain. In the third quarter of 2013 the unemployment rate reached 26% of the labour force, more than twice the Eurozone’s 12.1%.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Global crisis, Labour markets
Tags: labour-market flexibility, reforms, unemployment

A penny spent is a penny earned (by someone else): Measuring GDP

S Borağan Aruoba, Francis X. Diebold, Jeremy J Nalewaik, Frank Schorfheide, Dongho Song, 3 December 2013

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“A growing number of economists say that the government should shift its approach to measuring growth. The current system emphasises data on spending, but the bureau also collects data on income. In theory the two should match perfectly – a penny spent is a penny earned by someone else.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: data, GDP, measurement, national income accounting, unemployment, US

Currency wars and the euro

Jens Nordvig, 25 November 2013

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A new battle for the ECB to fight

Last year, the ECB entered an existential battle for the euro. By promising to do ‘whatever it takes’ to safeguard the euro, the ECB managed to calm sovereign debt markets and engineer a much-needed easing of overall credit conditions in the Eurozone.

Topics: EU institutions, Exchange rates, Monetary policy
Tags: Bundesbank, Currency wars, ECB, euro, eurozone, unemployment

Can temporary in-work support help the long-term unemployed enter sustained work?

Richard Dorsett, 21 November 2013

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There is growing awareness among policymakers that, in order to break the so-called ‘low pay, no pay’ cycle, labour market programmes must do more than just encourage job entry. To help the unemployed achieve long-term self-sufficiency, they must also support them in work.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: hysteresis, incentives, low pay, tax credits, unemployment

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