Colin Hottman, Stephen Redding, David E. Weinstein , Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Recent research highlights that important factors for firm size are costs, quality, markups, and product scope. This column explores the sources that make these factors differ across firms. Quality, including in the form of variation in product scope, is the chief determinant of firm sales. Marginal cost variations do not matter much for firm size.

Filippo di Mauro, Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Policies aimed at enhancing firm productivity may greatly benefit from firm-level evidence. Unfortunately, micro-founded data, particularly of cross-country nature, remain largely unavailable. This column presents a new firm-level database built by a research network of the EU system of central banks (CompNet). This data base allows investigating how firm size and labour costs interact at different levels of productivity. This new cross-country data base, and its potential to expand, could be of great policy value.

John Van Reenen, Friday, March 5, 2010

How important are management practices in driving the performance of firms and the productivity of nations across Asia, Europe and North America? John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about CEP’s research programme on the economics of management and productivity. The interview was recorded in London in February 2010.

Dean Yang, Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Many emphasise the importance of export growth in economic development, but does exporting increase economic growth or does growth increase exports? This column presents evidence from a natural experiment – demand shocks experienced by Chinese exporters due to the Asian financial crisis – suggesting that exporting improves firm performance.

Sandra Poncet, Monday, February 16, 2009

This column says that less-productive Japanese firms are more sensitive to distance and institutional quality in their locational decisions abroad. Alternatively, the greater responsiveness of low-productivity firms to the presence of an export promotion agency or a Japanese community indicates that networks and spillovers may help to mitigate these impediments.

Events