Banks, government bonds, and default: What do the data say?

Nicola Gennaioli, Alberto Martin, Stefano Rossi 19 July 2014

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Recent events in Europe have illustrated how government defaults can jeopardise domestic bank stability. Growing concerns of public insolvency since 2010 caused great stress in the European banking sector, which was loaded with Euro-area debt (Andritzky 2012). Problems were particularly severe for banks in troubled countries, which entered the crisis holding a sizeable share of their assets in their governments’ bonds – roughly 5% in Portugal and Spain, 7% in Italy, and 16% in Greece (2010 EU Stress Test).

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  sovereign debt, financial crises, banking, banks, bonds, sovereign default, credit, bank lending, risk-weighting

Making macroprudential regulation operational

Anil K Kashyap , Dimitri Tsomocos, Alexandros Vardoulakis 18 July 2014

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The IMF staff (Benes et al. 2014) recently unveiled a new model that “has been developed at the IMF to support macrofinancial and macroprudential policy analysis”. In introducing the model they argue that “such new analytical frameworks require a major revamp of the conventional linear dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models”. We agree with Benes et al.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  banks, Macroprudential policy, savers, model building

Spillovers from systemic bank defaults

Mark Mink, Jakob de Haan 24 May 2014

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Financial-crisis management and prevention policies often focus on mitigating spillovers from the default of systemically important banks. During the recent crisis, governments avoided large bank failures by insuring and purchasing intermediaries’ troubled assets, by providing them with capital injections, and even by outright nationalisations. After the crisis, financial regulators designed additional requirements for those institutions that the Financial Stability Board designated as globally systemically important banks (G-SIBs).

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  financial stability, spillovers, regulation, banking, banks, systemic risk

Exploring the transmission channels of contagious bank runs

Martin Brown, Stefan Trautmann, Razvan Vlahu 10 April 2014

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Financial contagion – the situation in which liquidity or insolvency risk is transmitted from one financial institution to another – is viewed by policymakers and academics as a key source of systemic risk in the banking sector. In particular, the events in the 2007–2009 Global Crisis have turned the attention of policymakers towards the potential contagion of liquidity withdrawals across banks and the resulting implications for financial stability.

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  experimental economics, financial stability, financial crisis, global crisis, banking, contagion, banks, systemic risk, bank runs

Estimating the impact of changes in aggregate bank capital requirements during an upswing

Joseph Noss, Priscilla Toffano 06 April 2014

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The recent financial crisis and economic contraction that followed highlighted the crucial role that banks play in facilitating the extension of credit and enabling economic growth. This underlies the economic rationale for imposing regulations on the banking industry, including minimum capital requirements designed to mitigate risks banks would not otherwise account for in their behaviour.

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  regulations, bank regulation, banking, capital requirements, banks, BASEL III, credit, Macroprudential policy, bank capital

The puzzling pervasiveness of dysfunctional banking

Charles W Calomiris interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam,

Date Published

Fri, 03/21/2014

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See Also

Calomiris, C W and S H Haber (2014), Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit, Princeton University Press.

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Topics

Financial markets
Tags
credit booms, banking, banks, systemic risk, recapitalisation, Eurozone crisis, Bank credit, bank capital

Related Article(s)

The limits to partial banking unions The AQR and stress testing the European banking system Banking union for Europe – where do we stand? Eastern European credit crunch and foreign bank funding Bank credit during the global crisis: A cross-country comparison
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February 2014

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The AQR and stress testing the European banking system

Viral Acharya interviewed by Viv Davies,

Date Published

Fri, 03/14/2014

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See Also

Acharya, V and S Steffen (2014) "Falling short of expectations? Stress-testing the European banking system", VoxEU.org, 17 January.

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Topics

Financial markets
Tags
banking, banks, systemic risk, recapitalisation, Eurozone crisis, banking union, bank capital, Asset Quality Review, stress testing

Related Article(s)

Banking union for Europe – where do we stand? Stress tests: a success for cooperation and transparency – and also very good for Spain A call for liquidity stress testing Bank resolution: from Cinderella to centre stage The urgent need to recapitalise Europe’s banks How much capital do European banks need?
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February 2014

A call for liquidity stress testing and why it should not be neglected

Clemens Bonner 06 February 2014

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The recent financial crisis has shown that neglecting liquidity risks comes at substantial costs. In order to reinforce banks’ resilience to liquidity risks, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) proposed the introduction of two harmonised liquidity standards:

  • The liquidity coverage ratio; and
  • The net stable funding ratio.

While the implementation of harmonised liquidity regulation across the globe is a unique and necessary step for supervision, one single metric cannot provide a complete picture of an institution’s liquidity risk profile.

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  liquidity, banks, stress tests

Falling short of expectations? Stress-testing the European banking system

Viral Acharya, Sascha Steffen 17 January 2014

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The Eurozone is mired in a recession. In 2013, the GDP of the 17 Eurozone countries fell by an average of 0.5%, and the outlook for 2014 shows considerable risks across the region. To stabilise the common currency area and its (partly insolvent) financial system, a Eurozone banking union is being established. An important part of the banking union is the Single Supervisory Mechanism, which will transfer the oversight of Europe’s largest banks to the ECB (Beck 2013).

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  banking, banks, systemic risk, recapitalisation, Eurozone crisis, banking union, bank capital, Asset Quality Review, stress testing

Why fiscal sustainability matters

Willem Buiter 10 January 2014

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Does fiscal sustainability matter only when there is a fiscal house on fire, as was the case with the Greek sovereign insolvency in 2011–12? Far from it.

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Topics:  Financial markets Global crisis International finance Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  eurozone, sovereign debt, capital flows, financial crisis, credit booms, fiscal policy, emerging markets, global financial crisis, banking, banks, Eurozone crisis, Currency wars, fiscal sustainability, banking union, sovereign debt restructuring, balance-sheet recession

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