New evidence on the durability of social norms

John Helliwell, Shun Wang, Jinwen Xu, 12 March 2014

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Recent studies find that individuals’ social norms – as evidenced by their opinions and behaviour – can be transmitted from one generation to the next within the same cultural setting (Algan and Cahuc 2010, Bjørnskov 2012, Dohmen et al. 2012, Guiso et al. 2006, Rainer and Siedler 2009, Rice and Feldman 1997).

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Migration
Tags: Culture, immigration, institutions, migration, social attitudes, social norms, trust

National institutions and subnational development in Africa

Stelios Michalopoulos, Elias Papaioannou, 11 October 2013

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Few issues have received more inquiry in the social sciences than "what are the fundamental determinants of comparative development?" The institutional view asserts that the ultimate causes of underdevelopment are poorly performing institutional structures, such as lack of constraints on the executive, poor property-rights protection, as well as inefficient legal and court systems (s

Topics: Development, Economic history, Institutions and economics
Tags: Africa, Culture, institutions, politics and economics

Long-term barriers to growth

Enrico Spolaore, Romain Wacziarg, 3 October 2013

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Students of comparative development have turned their focus to factors rooted deeper and deeper in history.

Topics: Development, Economic history
Tags: ancestry, Culture, development, geography, growth, technology transfer

Understanding trust: The role of false consensus

Jeffrey V. Butler, Paola Giuliano, Luigi Guiso, 18 December 2012

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Every day millions of people deal with others they know nothing or very little about. A Norwegian tourist buys a carpet in Casablanca. A woman in Mexico City hails a cab on the street. A person with a never-before-experienced eye pain asks an ophthalmologist for advice.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: Culture, false consensus, trust

Does language shape our economy? Female/male grammatical distinctions and gender economics

Victor Gay, Estefania Santacreu-Vasut, Amir Shoham, 29 August 2012

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In his Nobel Prize lecture, Douglas North (1993) argued that cultural knowledge is transmitted via language. Yet, language may be more than a vehicle of transmission, as the linguist Benjamin L Whorf hypothesised (1956):

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Gender
Tags: Culture, gender economics, language

Laws and norms

Jean Tirole, Roland Bénabou, 21 November 2011

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 8663 for free here. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/DP8663
Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: Culture, laws, norms, psychology, social attitudes, values

Selecting World Heritage sites: A new proposal

Lasse Steiner, Bruno S Frey, 18 November 2011

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The UNESCO World Heritage sites have become major attractions for cultural tourism and are icons of national identity. Being put on the UNESCO World Heritage List comes with considerable media coverage – and naturally governments invest substantial time and effort in order to gain an entry.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: Culture, UNESCO, world heritage

On the origins of gender roles: women and the plough

Alberto Alesina, Paola Giuliano, Nathan Nunn, 6 June 2011

Vox users can download CEPR Discussion Paper 8418 for free here. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: www.cepr.org/DP8418
Topics: Development, Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets
Tags: Culture, gender inequality, values

The geography of hate: How anti-Semitism in interwar Germany was influenced by the medieval mass murder of Jews

Nico Voigtländer, Hans-Joachim Voth, 22 May 2011

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What causes some people to engage in hate crime, while others remain aloof? Scholars have examined the role of ignorance and political incentives in the formation of groups dominated by hatred (Glaeser 2005). What has remained underexplored is the extent to which cultural transmission predisposes people to act violently, in a fashion similar to that of their ancestors.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: Anti-Semitism, Culture, Germany

Divide and rule or the rule of the divided? The effect of national and ethnic institutions on African under-development

Elias Papaioannou, Stelios Michalopoulos, 15 November 2010

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The conventional wisdom on the deep determinants of African development places colonisation at the centre of any explanation. An influential body of research suggests that the extractive colonial institutions that Europeans established in the late 19th century, crucially contributed to African underdevelopment.

Topics: Development, Institutions and economics, Politics and economics
Tags: Africa, Culture, development, growth, institutions

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