How to jumpstart the Eurozone economy

Francesco Giavazzi, Guido Tabellini 21 August 2014

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The mantra is that once again it is up to the ECB to save the Eurozone. Quantitative easing is the last policy tool available to jumpstart the Eurozone economy. The longer the ECB waits before starting to buy government bonds, the further away will the recovery be. This analysis, however, overestimates the power of monetary policy.

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  ECB, monetary policy, fiscal policy, quantitative easing, public debt, aggregate demand, Eurozone economy, stagnation

Identifying and quantifying monetary policy transmission through bank balance sheets

Kaoru Hosono, Daisuke Miyakawa 09 August 2014

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How does monetary policy affect firm activities? While there is long-standing literature on this issue, the transmission mechanism of monetary policy is currently attracting renewed attention. The reason is that many central banks – including the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the ECB, and the Bank of Japan – have introduced unconventional monetary policies such as quantitative easing and credit easing in the wake of the Global Crisis, and sooner or later will have to exit from these policies.

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Topics:  Financial markets Global crisis Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, Japan, global crisis, quantitative easing, unconventional monetary policy, balance sheets, financial accelerator, credit easing, bank lending channel

What are the macroeconomic effects of asset purchases?

Martin Weale, Tomasz Wieladek 10 June 2014

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After policy rates fell close to zero in response to the global financial crisis of 2008-09, the scope for further conventional monetary policy easing was exhausted. As a result, both the Bank of England and the Federal Reserve embarked on large-scale asset purchases of government and financial securities (see Figures 1 and 2).

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  inflation, Federal Reserve, Phillips curve, Bank of England, quantitative easing, unconventional monetary policy, output

ECB: An appropriate monetary policy

Mickey Levy 16 May 2014

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Europe’s modest economic recovery and uncomfortably low inflation put the ECB in a bind. Although economic conditions are improving gradually (European Commission 2014), concerns about the potentially negative impacts of deflation persist (Armstrong et al. 2014). The ECB’s top near-term priorities are to avoid deflation (and apparently even sustained low inflation) and extend the economic recovery.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  ECB, eurozone, monetary policy, quantitative easing, bank lending

Considering QE, Mario? Buy US bonds, not Eurobonds

Jeffrey Frankel 24 March 2014

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The ECB should further ease monetary policy. Inflation at 0.8% across the Eurozone is below the target of ‘close to 2%’, and unemployment in most countries is still high. Under the current conditions, it is hard for the periphery countries to bring their costs the rest of the way back down to internationally competitive levels as they need to do. If inflation is below 1% Eurozone-wide, then the periphery countries have to suffer painful deflation.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  ECB, euro, quantitative easing

Clarifying the debate about deflation concerns

Mickey Levy 21 February 2014

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A common theme among many economic policymakers, financial market participants, and the media is that rich industrialised nations face a high risk of deflation, and that deflation always harms economic performance and so must be combatted with aggressive macroeconomic stimulus. Such broad assessments are misleading, and under certain circumstances may lead to misguided policies. More clarity on the topic is required.

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Topics:  Global crisis Monetary policy

Tags:  eurozone, US, Europe, Japan, deflation, disinflation, quantitative easing

Unconventional monetary policy normalisation and emerging-market capital flows

Andrew Burns, Mizuho Kida, Jamus Lim, Sanket Mohapatra, Marc Stocker 21 January 2014

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Quantitative easing (QE), which started in 2008, swelled the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet to an unprecedented $3.4 trillion. In May 2013, the Fed announced that it would evaluate the possibility of a reversal of its unconventional monetary policies – QE in particular .

The event, which has come to be known as ‘tapering’, prompted a sharp, negative response from financial markets (the so-called ‘taper tantrum’):

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance Monetary policy

Tags:  Federal Reserve, quantitative easing, unconventional monetary policy, tapering

Unconventional monetary policies revisited (Part II)

Biagio Bossone 05 October 2013

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Unconventional monetary policies: From quantitative easing to debt monetisation

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, quantitative easing, forward guidance, helicopter money, central-bank independence

The impact on the financial sector of long-term low nominal interest rates

Viral Acharya, Richard Portes, Richard Reid 03 July 2013

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The Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) recently organised a conference at the Brewers’ Hall, London, on 10 June 2013 titled ‘A long-term environment of low nominal interest rates: what are the consequences for the financial sector’?

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  liquidity trap, quantitative easing, Eurozone crisis, zero lower bound, Vox Views

Exit strategies: Time to think ahead

Charles Wyplosz 14 October 2013

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Update

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  liquidity trap, quantitative easing, Eurozone crisis, zero lower bound, Vox Views

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