Cyprus: The next blunder

Charles Wyplosz, 18 March 2013

a

A

The decision to tax all Cypriot bank deposits has attracted massive attention (Spiegel 2013) – and rightly so. It is a huge blunder:

Topics: EU institutions, Macroeconomic policy
Tags: Cyprus, EU, Eurozone crisis

How much do countries benefit from membership in the European Union?

Nauro F Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, Luigi Moretti, 9 April 2014

a

A

The process of economic integration in Europe is more than half a century old. WWII provided impetus and, even if from the outset it was driven much by politics, considerations about economic benefits have always been paramount (Martin et al. 2012.) Integration has since deepened and broadened, with slowdowns but without major reversals.

Topics: EU institutions
Tags: EU, EU enlargement, monetary benefits

The eye, the needle and the camel: Rich countries can benefit from EU membership

Nauro F Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, Luigi Moretti, 5 April 2014

a

A

EU members are all alike; every EU candidate is a candidate in its own way. This is, of course, our attempt at rephrasing Anna Karenina’s opener (“Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way”). Tolstoy had marriage in mind while Diamond (1997) had domesticated animals.

Topics: EU institutions
Tags: economic benefits, EU, EU enlargement

European merger policy reform

Tomaso Duso, Klaus Gugler, Florian Szücs, 26 January 2014

a

A

In May 2004, the legal basis for merger evaluation in the EU was substantially revised. By then, it was apparent that the old legislation – which first came into force in 1989 – was lacking in a number of ways.

Topics: Competition policy, EU policies
Tags: Competition policy, deterrence, dominance, EU, merger policy, mergers, mergers and acquisitions, transparency

Meeting Russia’s challenge to EU’s Eastern Partnership

Thorvaldur Gylfason, Per Magnus Wijkman, 25 January 2014

a

A

EU’s Eastern Partnership is in turmoil after its Summit in Vilnius on 29 November 2013.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: Eastern Partnership, EU, Russia, Ukraine

What drives protests in the Ukraine? This time, it is institutions

Nauro F Campos, 22 December 2013

a

A

Once more, mass political protests erupted in 2013, this time in Ukraine. Protests are starting to spread and swell (freezing temperatures notwithstanding), but so far they have been mostly concentrated in the capital city.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Institutions and economics
Tags: EU, protests, Ukraine, weak institutions

Aligning energy markets and climate-policy objectives in the EU

Carlo Carraro, Thomas Longden, Giacomo Marangoni, Massimo Tavoni, 27 November 2013

a

A

Europe’s commitment to reducing greenhouse-gas emissions has not prevented the paradoxical situation of a revival of coal imports and a reduction of gas consumption. This article reviews recent work on the appropriate measures that need to be implemented to move European energy markets closer to the energy mix consistent with climate-policy targets.

Topics: Energy, Environment, EU policies
Tags: carbon pricing, climate policy, coal, energy mix, EU, greenhouse gases, natural gas, renewables subsidies

Do European fines deter price fixing?

Mario Mariniello, 22 September 2013

a

A

Anti-cartel enforcement is the least controversial of competition-policy themes. Price fixing, market sharing and other agreements to restrict competition have obvious negative effects on welfare.

Topics: Competition policy, EU policies
Tags: Cartels, competition, EU, price fixing

Eastern European migrants are net contributors – not costs – in the West

Joakim Ruist, 17 September 2013

a

A

In 2004 when the EU expanded from 15 to 25 member countries, all EU15 countries except Sweden made use of the possibility to temporarily restrict the new EU citizens’ access to their labour markets and welfare systems for up to seven years. The UK and Ireland only imposed minor restrictions.

Topics: Migration
Tags: Eastern Europe, EU, public finance

Migration and wage effects of taxing top earners: Evidence from the foreigners' tax scheme in Denmark

Henrik Kleven, Camille Landais, Emmanuel Saez, Esben Schultz, 17 September 2013

a

A

Tax-induced international mobility of talent is a controversial public-policy issue, especially when tax rates differ substantially across countries and migration barriers are low as in the case of the EU.

Topics: Migration, Taxation
Tags: EU, migration, tax competition

Vox eBooks

Events

Subscribe