Rosario Crinò, Laura Ogliari, Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 00:00

The production of high-quality goods influences key aspects of countries’ economic performance, including growth and development. This column argues that removing credit market imperfections may help countries transition from the production of low-quality to high-quality goods, especially in industries that are more sensitive to financial frictions.

Çağatay Bircan, Ralph De Haas, Friday, May 15, 2015 - 00:00

Innovation enhances economic growth but the mechanisms that underpin the spread of products remain largely unclear. Based on new micro-data from Russia, this column argues that access to credit helps firms to adopt products and production processes that are new to them. However, there is little evidence that bank credit stimulates in-house R&D. Thus, banks can facilitate the diffusion of technologies within developing countries but their role in pushing the technological frontier is limited.

Olivier Blanchard, Friday, October 3, 2014 - 00:00

Philippe Bacchetta, Kenza Benhima, Sunday, August 24, 2014 - 00:00

Among the various explanations behind global imbalances, the role of corporate saving has received relatively little attention. This column argues that corporate saving is quantitatively relevant, and proposes a theory that is consistent with the stylised facts and useful for understanding the current phase of global rebalancing. The theory implies that, while the economic contraction originating in developed countries has pushed interest rates towards the zero lower bound, the recent growth slowdown in emerging countries could push them out of it.

Thorsten Beck, Haki Pamuk, Burak Uras, Monday, April 21, 2014 - 00:00

A recent literature shows that access to formal savings devices improves entrepreneurial outcomes in developing economies. This column presents research comparing the effect of saving in formal accounts with alternative, less formal measures. Findings suggest that entrepreneurs use formal saving to insulate themselves from household consumption commitments.

Emanuele Baldacci, Sanjeev Gupta, Carlos Mulas-Granados, Monday, March 31, 2014 - 00:00

The recent debate on the link between austerity and growth has focused on the short run. This column discusses recent research into the link between fiscal consolidation and medium-term growth under different financial conditions. If credit is not available to consumers and investors, private demand is less able to compensate for cutbacks in public demand, so large spending cuts can have a negative effect on growth. Difficult financial conditions probably explain why fiscal adjustments that worked in the 1990s have not produced similar beneficial effects on growth in recent years.

Petra Gerlach-Kristen, Rossana Merola, Conor O'Toole, Sunday, December 1, 2013 - 00:00

Households tend to smooth their consumption and that’s why expenditures do not display a large variability over time. However, the recent financial crisis has been associated with a large decrease in consumption in certain countries. This column presents evidence that a drop in income during a crisis leads to a lower short-run consumption. Furthermore, micro data analysis shows that some households are affected more than others. Thus, policy recommendations can be made only after taking household heterogeneity into account.

Peter N. Gal, Gabor Pinter, Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 00:00

Renting capital goods makes up 20% of total capital expenses by US companies and this type of capital spending increases in downturns. This column discusses research showing that the systematic pattern of corporate leasing can be linked to credit constraints. This means that a robust rental sector has the potential to mitigate the negative effects of financial disruptions when obtaining credit becomes difficult.

Thorsten Beck, Berrak Buyukkarabacak, Felix Rioja, Neven Valev, Thursday, July 9, 2009 - 00:00

How does financial development affect macroeconomic outcomes? Previous studies have relied on aggregate measures. This column introduces a data set that distinguishes between lending to enterprises and households and investigates the consequences for economic growth, income inequality, and consumption smoothing.

CEPR Policy Research