The fiscal consequences of unrestricted immigration from Romania and Bulgaria

Joakim Ruist 18 January 2014

a

A

Since 1 January, citizens of Romania and Bulgaria have the same freedom of movement inside the European Union as citizens of other member states. The approaching end to transnational restrictions caused intense public debate in several of the richer EU countries during the past year, stoked by fears that large numbers of poor Romanians and Bulgarians would migrate to the richer EU countries and impose a heavy burden on public finances.

a

A

Topics:  EU policies Europe's nations and regions Migration Welfare state and social Europe

Tags:  immigration policy, fiscal burden, public finance

The long term economic impacts of reducing migration

Katerina Lisenkova 10 January 2014

a

A

The large influx of immigrants following the accession of eastern European countries to the EU in 2004 brought migration policy to the forefront of the public agenda and political debate. Large net migration flows are a relatively recent phenomenon in the UK; consistent positive net migration numbers have only been observed since the 1990s. During the 2010 election campaign, the senior partner of the current UK coalition government (the Conservative Party) set their migration policy target to reduce the level of net migration from “hundreds of thousands to tens of thousands”.

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Labour markets Migration

Tags:  immigration policy, UK, fiscal burden

The fiscal effects of immigration to the UK

Christian Dustmann, Tommaso Frattini 13 November 2013

a

A

The impact of immigration on the tax and welfare system and the net fiscal consequences is perhaps the single most prominent economic issue in the public debate over the pros and cons of immigration.

a

A

Topics:  Migration Welfare state and social Europe

Tags:  welfare state, immigration, migration, benefits, UK, fiscal burden

The fiscal effects of A8 migration to the UK

Christian Dustmann, Tommaso Frattini, Caroline Halls 08 August 2009

a

A

Immigration often causes debate in receiving countries about the potentially negative consequences an influx of immigrants may have on the welfare of incumbent residents. Of particular concern is whether immigrants “pay their way” in the welfare system. These fears were echoed in the debate following the 2004 EU enlargement to include Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, and Poland.

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Migration

Tags:  EU, migration, UK, fiscal burden