Protection of intellectual property to foster innovations in the service sector

Masayuki Morikawa, 20 July 2014

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Given the declining labour force due to population ageing, accelerating the productivity growth of industries – especially the service industries – is an important element of the growth strategy in Japan and most advanced countries. While there are a variety of factors affecting productivity, innovation is one of the key determinants of productivity growth.

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: growth, innovation, intellectual property, Japan, patents, productivity, R&D, services, trade secrets

Did the internet prevent all invention from moving to one place?

Chris Forman, Avi Goldfarb, Shane Greenstein, 23 May 2014

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Reading the technology press, it often seems as if the media think all high-tech invention happens in Silicon Valley. This parochial viewpoint highlights the ‘agglomeration’ advantages that the Valley provides to inventors because so many technology firms are located in the same place.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: agglomeration, economic geography, information technology, internet, invention, patents, technology

Quid pro quo: Technology capital transfers for market access in China

Thomas Holmes, Ellen McGrattan, Edward C. Prescott, 8 November 2013

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Over the past two decades China’s economy has grown rapidly and the nation has become a major destination for foreign direct investment. Surprisingly, little of China's FDI inflows come from technologically advanced, dominant players in global investment such as the US, Europe, and Japan (Prasad and Wei 2007, Branstetter and Foley 2010).

Topics: Global economy, International trade
Tags: China, FDI, intellectual property rights, patents

Does education lead to more innovation?

Otto Toivanen, Lotta Väänänen, 21 July 2013

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There is a broad, research-based consensus amongst academic researchers, policymakers and pundits that the key to economic growth lies in improving productivity. There is also wide agreement that productivity increases come through innovation. As Charles Jones argues: “[t]he more inventors we have, the more ideas we discover, and the richer we all are” (2005).

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: inventors, patents

The global race for inventors

Carsten Fink, Ernest Miguelez, Julio Raffo, 17 July 2013

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Many countries are currently debating and reforming their immigration policies. One prominent question in these discussions is how to attract skilled workers that can ease domestic skills shortages and foster innovation and entrepreneurship.

Topics: Migration, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: innovation, inventors, migration, patents

Do patent rights impede follow-on innovation?

Alberto Galasso, Mark Schankerman, 14 May 2013

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The patent system is one of the main instruments governments use to increase research and development incentives, while at the same time promoting follow-on innovation. However, there is growing concern among academic scholars and policy makers that patent rights are themselves becoming an impediment, rather than an incentive, to innovation.

Topics: International trade, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: innovation, patents

Cumulative innovation and market value: Evidence from patent citations

Sharon Belenzon, 3 July 2012

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Knowledge spillovers play a critical role in economic growth. For example, x-ray-computed tomography technology was developed and patented by EMI, which was able to exploit it initially. However, it also inspired hundreds of subsequent inventions by firms such as Pfizer, Syntex, Picker, and General Electric.

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: inventions, knowledge spillovers, patents, US

Is the dragon learning to fly? An analysis of the Chinese patent explosion

Zhihong Yu , Markus Eberhardt, Christian Helmers, 27 September 2011

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China’s economic success over the past three decades has been widely regarded as the result of its ability to produce manufactured goods at low cost, building on the availability of cheap labour and scale economies, while relying on existing (albeit in part advanced) technologies of production.

Topics: International trade, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: China, intellectual property rights, patents

Another reason for the EU patent: Declining validation rates

Bas Straathof, Sander van Veldhuizen, 9 December 2010

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In a couple of weeks the European Council will decide on the implementation of the EU patent. This is the last chance in the foreseeable future to overcome the deadlock in the negotiations on harmonising the patent law.

Topics: EU institutions, EU policies, International trade, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: EU patent, Italy, patents, Spain

On the consequences of an EU patent for inventors and patent offices

Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Jérôme Danguy, 14 July 2010

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From a “European Union” perspective, the European patent system is highly fragmented. Indeed, it is actually a sum of 27 national patent systems – once a patent is granted it must be upheld, managed, and enforced at the country level. In case of litigation, it is frequent for applicants to be involved in several parallel litigations, with different outcomes across countries.

Topics: EU institutions, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: EU patent, patents

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