Xavier Vives, Tuesday, March 17, 2015

The 2007–08 crisis revealed regulatory failures that had allowed the shadow banking system and systemic risk to grow unchecked. This column evaluates recent proposals to reform the banking industry. Although appropriate pricing of risk should make activity restrictions redundant, there may nevertheless be complementarities between these two approaches. Ring-fencing may make banking groups more easily resolvable and therefore lower the cost of imposing market discipline.

Charles W Calomiris, Monday, January 28, 2013

Charles Calomiris talks to Viv Davies about what he sees as a pervasive change in the politics of banking that has enabled banking regulators and supervisors to pursue bad practices. Calomiris maintains that the keys to effective prudential regulatory reform are, first, to recognise the core incentive problems that encourage risk-taking and ineffective regulation, and second, to design simple reforms that are 'incentive-robust', for which a political coalition of support will be required. The interview was recorded by phone on 24 January 2013.

Biagio Bossone, Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Has unconsidered use of technology and exasperated market competition carried finance way afar from its original purpose, i.e. to serve the economy? This column offers a set of simple suggestions for complex interventions on the financial regulatory world. It suggests incentives be designed to lead financial institutions to place people’s real economic needs at the core of their mission, thus humanising finance.

Charles W Calomiris, Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Over the last few decades, banking regulators and supervisors have failed to do their job. This column argues that a failure of political will enabled stakeholders to pursue bad practices, and suggests a roadmap for reform. Enforcing a reform agenda marked by simplicity is plausible, and would avoid much of the collateral damage that comes from many hundreds of pages of complex, costly and misguided mandates that typically act as substitutes for credible reform. Overcoming the challenge of political will, however, remains a challenge.

Viral Acharya, Tuesday, October 16, 2012

With most of the debate around banking union in the Eurozone focusing primarily on the financial institutions it will regulate, this column argues that the issue of sovereign debt of the members of the Eurozone needs also to be taken into account.

Michael Bordo, Friday, April 23, 2010

Michael Bordo of Rutgers University compares US banking panics in the early 1930s with panics in the shadow banking system and the repo market in 2007 and in investment banks and the universal banking system after Lehman failed. He argues that the bailouts of ‘too big to fail’ banks may lead to future crises, and discusses possible remedies. The interview with Romesh Vaitilingam was recorded at a conference on ‘Lessons from the Great Depression for the Making of Economic Policy’ in London in April 2010.

Viral Acharya, Thomas F Cooley, Matthew Richardson, Ingo Walter, Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The NYU Stern group – authors of the influential book Restoring Financial Stability: How to Repair a Failed System – have completed a new ebook that assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the US financial reform legislation. This column introduces the new ebook.

Charles A.E. Goodhart, Thursday, December 17, 2009

The structure of contracts in financial markets is deeply rooted in history. This column retraces the origins of financial contracting and explains why mutual fund banking proposals are wrong headed. It proposes to shift more of the functions of our current banking system away from limited liability back into partnerships. This would involve requiring hedge funds to be entirely separated from banks.

Viral Acharya, Matthew Richardson, Ingo Walter, Thomas F Cooley, Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The NYU Stern group – authors of the influential book Restoring Financial Stability: How to Repair a Failed System – have completed a new ebook that assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the US financial reform legislation. This column introduces the new ebook.

Events