Taxing the 1%: Why the top tax rate could be over 80%

Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez, Stefanie Stantcheva 08 December 2011

a

A

In the United States, the share of total pre-tax income accruing to the top 1% has more than doubled from less than 10% in the 1970s to over 20% today (CBO 2011 and Piketty and Saez 2003). A similar pattern is true of other English-speaking countries. Contrary to the widely held view, however, globalisation and new technologies are not to blame. Other OECD countries such as those in continental Europe or Japan have seen far less concentration of income among the mega rich (World Top Incomes Database 2011).

a

A

Topics:  Poverty and income inequality Taxation

Tags:  US, wage inequality, Occupy Wall Street

Does the winner take it all? Wage inequality and exports

Dieter M. Urban, Christoph Moser 06 September 2010

a

A

The theoretical case for the potential effect of trade on the distribution of income has a long and distinguished history. It starts with the first musings of David Ricardo and has advanced to now include models with heterogeneous firms, heterogeneous workers, and labour market imperfections, which have shown the consequences of trade for income distribution across different sets of individuals (e.g. Helpman et al. 2009, Egger and Kreickemeier 2009).

a

A

Topics:  International trade Labour markets Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  Germany, wage inequality, exports

What are the real returns from a higher education?

Enrico Moretti,

Date Published

Mon, 11/03/2008

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

Education Labour markets Poverty and income inequality

Partners

CEPR

URL

http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6997.asp

Despite a large literature documenting the increase in the wage returns from a higher education over the last 30 years, the rate of growth in the number of college graduates in the US is still low relative to earlier periods. While the increase in the return to education is typically measured using nominal wages, the author of CEPR DP6997 looks at housing costs for high school and college graduates and discovers that, when looking at real as opposed to nominal wages, the return to education and the increase in inequality may be smaller than previously thought.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

-10

cepr_featured

1
Tags
wage inequality, return to education, well-being

Can wage inequality be explained by increasing dispersion in firm productivity?

Giulia Faggio , Kjell G. Salvanes, John Van Reenen 25 November 2007

a

A

Wage inequality has increased substantially in the United States and the United Kingdom in the last thirty years. This fact, which is now solidly established, fuels debate on a wide range of policy measures ranging from taxation, corporate governance and labour market institutions all the way to trade, education, and safety-net policies. In some quarters, rising inequality is held up as evidence that pro-market reforms help the rich and powerful to exploit the average worker. In others, it is used as an argument for programmes to upgrade skills.

a

A

Topics:  Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  wage inequality, productivity dispersion, technology, manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors

Offshoring may reduce income inequality in short term

Karolina Ekholm, Karen-Helene Ulltveit-Moe,

Date Published

Mon, 07/30/2007

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

International trade

Partners

CEPR

URL

http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6402.asp

The received wisdom about the relative wages of skilled workers in the US is that the wage gap is growing as the skill intensity within industries is increasing, and these changes in wage and employment structure are often attributed to skill-based technical changes rather than to globalization and trade. Since the early 1990s, however, the pattern has been different.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

-10

cepr_featured

0
Tags
wage inequality, trade, globalization, offshoring

More incentives for employees to work longer hours in US than in Europe

Josep Pijoan-Mas, Claudio Michelacci,

Date Published

Mon, 05/28/2007

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

Labour markets

Partners

CEPR

URL

http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6314.asp

Since the 1970s, the number of hours worked per employee has fallen substantially in continental Europe, while it has remained roughly constant in the US after reverting a trend of secular decline. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics in the US and the German Socio-Economic Panel, the authors of CEPR DP6314 show that this divergence in the number of hours worked per employee on the two sides of the Atlantic can be explained by the evolution of the respective labour market conditions over the last three decades.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

-9

cepr_featured

0
Tags
unemployment, wage inequality, search, working hours, human capital