Holger Görg, Olivier N. Godart, Aoife Hanley, Christiane Krieger-Boden, Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Many firms are replacing traditional working hours with more flexible arrangements, reflecting new thinking on employee motivation. This column presents evidence from Germany that trust-based working time is associated with increased innovation. However, trust-based working hours also contribute to the blurring of workers’ professional and private lives, and may lead to excessive overtime. Careful design of trust-based working arrangements is required to reap the innovations gains while avoiding the health pitfalls.

Henry Saffer, Karine Lamiraud, Wednesday, February 20, 2008

People have fewer friends and visit them less often than in the past. A popular explanation suggests that we’re working longer and have less time for friends, but recent research finds little tradeoff between working hours and social hours. The relevant tradeoffs, this column suggests, are between types of social interaction.

Claudio Michelacci, Josep Pijoan-Mas, Monday, September 17, 2007

Today Americans work much more than Europeans, while this was not the case back in the 1970s. Have Europeans become lazier than Americans? Arguably not: differences in working time across the two sides of the Atlantic simply reflect differences in workers incentives over their working life.

Josep Pijoan-Mas, Claudio Michelacci, Monday, May 28, 2007

Since the 1970s, the number of hours worked per employee has fallen substantially in continental Europe, while it has remained roughly constant in the US. The authors of CEPR DP6314 show that this divergence in the number of hours worked per employee on the two sides of the Atlantic can be explained by the evolution of the respective labour market conditions over the last three decades.

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