A safe asset for Eurozone QE: A proposal

Luis Garicano, Lucrezia Reichlin 14 November 2014

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As Europe moves closer to deflation, the ECB is gradually inching towards outright quantitative easing (QE) – increasing the monetary base through purchases of government bonds (Draghi 2014). But undertaking such purchases confronts a problem. There is no Eurozone ‘government bond’ to purchase. Were the ECB to purchase the debt of all member countries, it would end up with a large amount of debt on its balance sheet, making it impossible for a country to default without triggering very large redistribution.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  Eurozone QE, Safe Market Bonds, ECB, quantitative easing, unconventional monetary policy, diabolic loop, doom loop, sovereign debt, safe assets, savings glut, risk weights, bank capital

The role of corporate saving in global rebalancing

Philippe Bacchetta, Kenza Benhima 24 August 2014

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The increase in global imbalances in the last decade posed a theoretical challenge for international macroeconomics. Why did some less-developed countries with a higher need for capital, like China, lend to richer countries? The inconsistency of standard open-economy dynamic models with actual global capital flows had already been stressed before (e.g. by Lucas 1990), but the sensitivity to this issue became more acute with increasing global imbalances. This stimulated the development of several alternative theoretical frameworks.

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Topics:  International finance International trade

Tags:  interest rates, global imbalances, capital flows, saving, global crisis, credit constraints, savings glut, zero lower bound, corporate saving, global rebalancing

Lost in transmission

Heleen Mees 21 June 2011

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The past decade has been characterised by record-low interest rates, which has given rise to a whole new batch of economic literature on global imbalances, or the so-called saving glut. What has attracted much less attention is the fact that – while US Treasury yields have dropped to an all time low – the yield on equity capital has actually risen.

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Topics:  Global crisis Monetary policy

Tags:  US, global imbalances, quantitative easing, savings glut

The mystery of Chinese savings

Shang-Jin Wei 06 February 2010

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Much attention has been directed toward China’s high savings rate (Broda et al. 2009, Prasad 2009, Reisen 2009). Not only is the savings rate disproportionately high compared to virtually any other country, but it directly impacts China’s current account surplus and the US consumer debt and trade deficit. When national savings exceeds investment, the excess savings becomes China’s current account surplus.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research

Tags:  global imbalances, China, savings glut

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