How history can contribute to better economic education

Coen Teulings, 11 July 2014

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Historians tend to stress the particularities in history. Each event is unique, caused by a set of conditions that will never reproduce themselves again. In turn, each event causes new events, which therefore are equally unique and equally irreproducible. Hence, historians conduct painstaking research into the details of these conditions to understand the course of history.

Topics: Economic history, Education
Tags: agglomeration, Agriculture, economic history, geography, history, Industrial Revolution, institutions, new economic geography, urbanisation

Institutions, trade shocks, and regional differences in long-run educational and development trajectories

André Carlos Martínez, Aldo Musacchio, Martina Viarengo , 9 July 2014

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Understanding the determinants of long-run socio-economic development is a major concern for academics and policymakers in many countries around the world.

Topics: Development, Economic history, Education
Tags: Brazil, colonialism, development, education, extractive institutions, growth, Inequality, institutions, trade shocks

The euro crisis: Muddling through, or on the way to a more perfect euro union?

Joshua Aizenman, 3 July 2014

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The short history of the Eurozone has been remarkable and unprecedented – the euro project has moved from the planning board to a vibrant currency within less than ten years.

Topics: Institutions and economics, International finance, Monetary policy
Tags: ECB, euro, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, Germany, GIIPS, inflation targeting, institutions

British and French educational legacies in Africa

Denis Cogneau, Alexander Moradi , 17 May 2014

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Britain and France followed two very distinct approaches to education in their African colonies (Garner and Schafer 2006).

Topics: Development, Economic history, Education
Tags: Africa, colonialism, institutions, West Africa

New evidence on the durability of social norms

John Helliwell, Shun Wang, Jinwen Xu, 12 March 2014

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Recent studies find that individuals’ social norms – as evidenced by their opinions and behaviour – can be transmitted from one generation to the next within the same cultural setting (Algan and Cahuc 2010, Bjørnskov 2012, Dohmen et al. 2012, Guiso et al. 2006, Rainer and Siedler 2009, Rice and Feldman 1997).

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Migration
Tags: Culture, immigration, institutions, migration, social attitudes, social norms, trust

Unemployment, labour-market flexibility and IMF advice: Moving beyond mantras

Olivier Blanchard, Florence Jaumotte, Prakash Loungani, 18 October 2013

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Growth in advanced economies is gaining some speed. The IMF projects these economies will grow 2% next year, up from an expected 1.2% this year. The average unemployment rate in advanced economies is expected to inch down from its peak of 8.3% in 2010 to 8% next year. This is progress, but it is clearly not enough. The state of labour markets remains dismal for a number of reasons.

Topics: Labour markets, Welfare state and social Europe
Tags: collective bargaining, EZ crisis, IMF, institutions, labour-market flexibility, trust, unemployment, Unemployment insurance

National institutions and subnational development in Africa

Stelios Michalopoulos, Elias Papaioannou, 11 October 2013

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Few issues have received more inquiry in the social sciences than "what are the fundamental determinants of comparative development?" The institutional view asserts that the ultimate causes of underdevelopment are poorly performing institutional structures, such as lack of constraints on the executive, poor property-rights protection, as well as inefficient legal and court systems (s

Topics: Development, Economic history, Institutions and economics
Tags: Africa, Culture, institutions, politics and economics

Finding his own way: Ronald Coase (1910-2013)

Steven Medema, 18 September 2013

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Ronald Coase, who passed away last week at the age of 102, left an indelible mark on both economics and law. In 1991 he was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in recognition of his work on transaction costs and property rights.

Topics: Institutions and economics
Tags: case studies, history of economic thought, institutions, methodology, transaction costs

Unleashing growth: The decline of innovation-blocking institutions

Klaus Desmet, Stephen L. Parente, 18 May 2013

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Two hundred years ago, during the Napoleonic Wars, the Luddite movement rocked the English industrial landscape. Dissatisfied with falling wages and increased competition from mills employing cheap rural labour, the Luddites broke into factories at night, smashing spinning frames and power looms.

Topics: Economic history, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: growth, guilds, institutions

What explains political institutions? Evidence from colonial British America

Elena Nikolova, 17 August 2012

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Under what circumstances do democratic as opposed to authoritarian institutions emerge? Although a large literature has tackled this question (see Acemoglu et al. 2001, Acemoglu and Robinson 2012, Engerman and Sokoloff 2000), we still have an imperfect knowledge of how representative institutions originate and change.

Topics: Labour markets, Politics and economics
Tags: colonisation, democracy, economic history, institutions, US

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