New-breed global investors and emerging-market financial stability

Gaston Gelos, Hiroko Oura 23 August 2014

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The investor base matters since different investors behave differently. During the emerging-market sell-off episodes in 2013 and early 2014:

  • Retail-oriented mutual funds withdrew aggressively, but investors from different regions also tended to behave differently;
  • Institutional investors such as pension funds and insurance companies with long-term strategies broadly maintained their emerging-market investments.

Figure 1 shows the facts.

Figure 1. Bond flows to emerging-market economies 

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance

Tags:  Pension Funds, financial stability, capital flows, investment, emerging markets, financial deepening, herding, original sin, mutual funds, institutional investors

The credit cycle and vulnerabilities in emerging economies: the case of Latin America

Julián Caballero, Ugo Panizza, Andrew Powell 02 April 2014

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Over recent years credit growth in Latin America has been very strong, and countries have become more reliant on foreign bond issuances. These phenomena are linked, and in Caballero et al. (2014), we argue that they may have led to vulnerabilities which domestic and international supervisors are not well-equipped to assess.

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Topics:  Exchange rates Financial markets International finance

Tags:  exchange rates, Latin America, carry trade, credit conditions, original sin

Redemption or abstinence?

Ricardo Hausmann, Ugo Panizza 21 February 2010

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The emerging market crises of the 1990s focused the attention of economists on issues of debt composition and particularly currency denomination (Krugman 1999). A debate emerged in the late 1990s regarding the causes of the prevalence of foreign currency foreign debt in emerging markets. Some saw it as a consequence of moral hazard.

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Topics:  International finance

Tags:  emerging markets, Currency crises, original sin