Dirty little secrets: Inferring fossil-fuel subsidies from patterns in emission intensities

Radek Stefanski, 30 May 2014

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An astonishing feature of international energy and climate policy is that fossil fuels – often seen as the primary contributor to climate change – receive enormous government support (IMF 2013, IEA 2012). Surprisingly, no comprehensive database of directly measured, comparable fossil-fuel subsidies exists at the international level.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: carbon, emissions, energy, energy subsidy, fossil fuels, pollution, subsidies

Climate policy targets revisited

Richard S J Tol, 25 April 2014

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The Stern Review of the Economics of Climate Change is the most famous economic assessment of climate policy (Stern et al. 2006).

Topics: Environment
Tags: carbon, climate change, cost-benefit analysis, emissions, externalities, greenhouse gases, pollution

Breaking the climate stalemate?

Carlo Carraro, Valentina Bosetti, Massimo Tavoni, Thomas F. Rutherford, Richard Richels, Geoffrey Blanford, 7 December 2009

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On the eve of the UN’s highly-anticipated Copenhagen meeting, international climate policy negotiations remain in gridlock. Many OECD countries insist on binding emissions limits for their economic competitors in the developing world, while countries such as China and India are unwilling to accept such responsibility.

Topics: Environment
Tags: climate change, Copenhagen Summit, emissions

Trade, pollution, and the environment: New international evidence

Jaime de Melo, Nicole A. Mathys, Jean-Marie Grether, 28 November 2009

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Much concern has been raised that globalisation and trade liberalisation will lead to competition for investment and jobs, resulting in a worldwide degradation of environmental standards (the `race to the bottom´ effect) and /or in a delocalisation of heavy polluting industries in countries with lower standards (the `pollution havens´ effect – see Copeland and Taylor 2004).

Topics: Environment, International trade
Tags: emissions, pollution haven, race-to-the-bottom

How fast are CO2 emissions moving to Asia?

Jean-Marie Grether, Nicole A. Mathys, 21 November 2009

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In the run-up to a post-Kyoto agreement on greenhouse gas emissions, a major concern is the inclusion of the most important sources of global CO2 emissions. As these sources are linked to economic activity, it is largely suspected that their distribution across the Earth’s surface has shifted over recent decades.

Topics: Environment
Tags: centre of gravity, CO2, emissions

Border measures in US climate policy options

Jisun Kim, Gary Clyde Hufbauer, 17 October 2008

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Due to rising domestic and international pressures, several greenhouse gas (GHG) control bills have been introduced in the 110th Congress. Some states and regional groups have already enacted controls.

Topics: Energy, International trade
Tags: climate change, emissions, WTO

Climate policy uncertainty: Shall we hedge against it?

Valentina Bosetti, Carlo Carraro, Alessandra Sgobbi, Massimo Tavoni, 14 October 2008

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Despite growing concerns about climate change, there is little consensus about the scale and timing of actions needed to respond to it. International negotiations on an effective climate policy have been stalling for almost a decade now, and those currently underway might fail to reach a comprehensive agreement in the near future.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: climate change, emissions, global warming

What accounts for the clean-up of US manufacturing: technology or international trade?

Arik Levinson, 2 January 2008

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Antiglobalisation protesters display signs denouncing international trade's role in polluting the environment.1 Pundits write Op-Ed pieces cautioning that increased trade has environmental costs.2 And a majority of Americans agree that "freer trade puts the United States at a disadvantage because of our high ...

Topics: Environment, International trade, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: emissions, manufacturing, pollution, US

Climate Change, ethics and the economics of the global deal

Sir Nicholas Stern , 30 November 2007

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The problem of climate change involves a fundamental failure of markets: those who damage others by emitting greenhouse gases generally do not pay. Climate change is a result of the greatest market failure the world has seen. The evidence on the seriousness of the risks from inaction or delayed action is now overwhelming.

Topics: Energy
Tags: climate change, emissions, greenhouse gases

Next steps after the Kyoto Protocol: formulas for quantitative emission targets

Jeffrey Frankel, 25 June 2007

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It is a sign of how resigned the world has become to an absence of enlightened leadership from the United States that some were prepared to receive positively President Bush’s new position on Global Climate Change at the recent G8 meeting in Germany. The President conceded that it is a problem that is worth addressing.

Topics: Environment
Tags: climate change, emissions, Kyoto Protocol

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