The puzzling pervasiveness of dysfunctional banking

Charles W Calomiris interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam, 21 Mar 2014

Charles Calomiris talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his recent book, co-authored with Stephen Haber, ‘Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit’. They discuss how politics inevitably intrudes into bank regulation and why banking systems are unstable in some countries but not in others. Calomiris also presents his analysis of the political and banking history of the UK and how the well-being of banking systems depends on complex bargains and coalitions between politicians, bankers and other stakeholders. The interview was recorded in London in February 2014.

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See Also

Calomiris, C W and S H Haber (2014), Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit, Princeton University Press.

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Topics: Financial markets
Tags: bank capital, Bank credit, banking, banks, credit booms, Eurozone crisis, recapitalisation, systemic risk

TARGET balances, Bretton Woods, and the Great Depression

Michael Bordo, 21 March 2014

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During the Eurozone crisis, an analogy was made between the events in Europe between 2007 and 2012 and the collapse of the Bretton Woods System between 1968 and 1971. There has been a build-up of TARGET liabilities since 2007 by some central banks (notably Greece, Ireland, Portugal, and Spain, or the ‘GIPS’), and of TARGET assets by Germany and others.

Topics: Economic history, International finance
Tags: Bretton Woods, Central Banks, ECB, euro, Eurosystem, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, financial crisis, global imbalances, Great Depression, TARGET

A fiscal shock absorber for the Eurozone? Lessons from the economics of insurance

Daniel Gros, 19 March 2014

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Even before the euro crisis started, it had been widely argued that the Eurozone needed a mechanism to help countries overcome idiosyncratic shocks. The experience of the crisis itself seemed to make this case overwhelming, and throughout the EU institutions it is now taken for granted that the Eurozone needs a system of fiscal shock absorbers.

Topics: EU institutions, Macroeconomic policy, Welfare state and social Europe
Tags: euro, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, fiscal policy, fiscal shock absorbers, fiscal shocks, fiscal union, insurance

The AQR and stress testing the European banking system

Viral Acharya interviewed by Viv Davies, 14 Mar 2014

Viral Acharya talks to Viv Davies about his recent work with Sascha Steffen that, using publicly available data and a series of shortfall measures, estimates the capital shortfalls of EZ banks that will be stress-tested under the proposed Asset Quality Review. They also discuss the difference in accounting rules between US and EZ banks and the future potential for banking union in the Eurozone. The interview was recorded by phone on 25 February 2014.

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See Also

Acharya, V and S Steffen (2014) "Falling short of expectations? Stress-testing the European banking system", VoxEU.org, 17 January.

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Topics: Financial markets
Tags: Asset Quality Review, bank capital, banking, banking union, banks, Eurozone crisis, recapitalisation, stress testing, systemic risk

Falling short of expectations? Stress-testing the European banking system

Viral Acharya, Sascha Steffen, 17 January 2014

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The Eurozone is mired in a recession. In 2013, the GDP of the 17 Eurozone countries fell by an average of 0.5%, and the outlook for 2014 shows considerable risks across the region. To stabilise the common currency area and its (partly insolvent) financial system, a Eurozone banking union is being established.

Topics: Financial markets
Tags: Asset Quality Review, bank capital, banking, banking union, banks, Eurozone crisis, recapitalisation, stress testing, systemic risk

Why fiscal sustainability matters

Willem Buiter, 10 January 2014

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Does fiscal sustainability matter only when there is a fiscal house on fire, as was the case with the Greek sovereign insolvency in 2011–12? Far from it.

Topics: Financial markets, Global crisis, International finance, Macroeconomic policy
Tags: balance-sheet recession, banking, banking union, banks, capital flows, credit booms, Currency wars, emerging markets, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, financial crisis, fiscal policy, fiscal sustainability, global financial crisis, sovereign debt, sovereign debt restructuring

The ghost of Deauville

Ashoka Mody, 7 January 2014

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The aversion to debt restructuring in the Eurozone has been remarkable, even though public debt ratios in several countries are well above the IMF-identified critical debt overhang threshold of 100% of GDP (IMF 2012). By early 2010, some recognised the urgency of restructuring Greek public debt (Calomiris 2010).

Topics: Financial markets, International finance
Tags: Deauville, eurozone, Eurozone crisis, financial contagion, sovereign debt, sovereign debt restructuring

Joint liability in international lending: A proposal for amending the Treaty of Lisbon

Kaushik Basu, Joseph Stiglitz, 2 January 2014

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The sovereign debt crisis exposed weaknesses in the Eurozone’s financial architecture that may not have been fully anticipated when the founding treaties of the Eurozone were drafted. Key among these weak spots are the provisions of the Treaty of Lisbon which regulate intergovernmental debt obligations and preclude direct financing of sovereigns by the ECB.

Topics: EU institutions, International finance
Tags: eurozone, Eurozone crisis, Lisbon Treaty, Maastricht Treaty, moral hazard, no-bailout clause, sovereign debt

Does policy uncertainty reduce economic activity? Insights and evidence from large trade reforms

Kyle Handley, Nuno Limão, 23 November 2013

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The impact of policy uncertainty on economic activity is an issue traditionally associated with developing countries. Since 2008, however, the spotlight has shifted. Governments’ responses to the Great Recession and the Eurozone crisis have raised considerable uncertainty about the future policies of advanced economies.

Topics: International trade
Tags: China, Eurozone crisis, Great Recession, trade, uncertainty, US, WTO

What’s wrong with Europe?

Isabella Rota Baldini, Paolo Manasse, 4 November 2013

CEPR Policy Insight No.67 is available to download free of charge here.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/policy_insights/viewpi.php?pino=67
Topics: EU institutions
Tags: Eurozone crisis, productivity, US

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