The effect of immigration on public finances

Ian Preston 05 November 2014

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Much attention of researchers and policy-makers has been directed at the effects of immigration on the wages and employment of natives in the host country (for example, Friedberg and Hunt 1995; Manacorda et al 2012; Dustmann et al 2013). But most empirical studies have failed to find any convincing evidence of substantial negative impact.

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Topics:  Migration

Tags:  immigration, public finances

The labour market effects of immigration and emigration in OECD countries

Frédéric Docquier, Çağlar Özden, Giovanni Peri 06 October 2014

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The basis of the debate about migration into European countries is the perception that immigrants are unskilled and poor. Hence, the narrative goes, their arrival hurts the wages and employment prospects of less educated natives. At the same time, very little discussion is devoted to the patterns and economic consequences of emigration from European countries to other developed countries. The recent high-profile book by Collier (2013) is a typical example of this approach. Yet, the data indicate this might all be misguided.

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Topics:  Education Labour markets Migration

Tags:  OECD, migration, immigration, emigration, wages, complementarities, education

How immigration benefits natives despite labour market imperfections and income redistribution

Michele Battisti, Gabriel Felbermayr, Giovanni Peri, Panu Poutvaara 08 August 2014

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A fierce policy debate with little insight from economists

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Topics:  Labour markets Migration

Tags:  Labour Markets, unemployment, wages, immigration, redistribution, welfare, Skill Complementarities

Culture: Persistence and evolution

Francesco Giavazzi, Ivan Petkov, Fabio Schiantarelli 16 June 2014

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Are a person’s values and beliefs persistent, or do they evolve – possibly rather quickly – in response to the economic and institutional environment? This is a central question, for instance, if one is interested in assessing the likelihood of success of reforms that change rules within a country. Are such reforms doomed because a country’s culture cannot be changed, or can they succeed because they can change cultural attitudes by altering incentives, and if so, over what time horizon?

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Institutions and economics Migration

Tags:  US, immigration, religion, values, Culture, attitudes, beliefs

Public opinion on immigration: Has the recession changed minds?

Timothy J Hatton 07 June 2014

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Topics:  Migration Politics and economics

Tags:  democracy, immigration, politics, populism, European parliament

How highly educated immigrants raise native wages

Giovanni Peri, Kevin Shih, Chad Sparber 29 May 2014

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Immigration to the US has risen tremendously in recent decades. Though media attention and popular discourse often focus on illegal immigrants or the high foreign-born presence among less-educated workers, the data show that immigrants are drawn from both ends of the education spectrum. At the low end, immigrants grew from 5% of workers with a high school degree or less in 1970 to 20.8% in 2010. At the high end, the figure rose from 7.3% to 18.2% for those with graduate degrees over the same period.1

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Topics:  Labour markets Migration Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  US, growth, productivity, wages, immigration, innovation, complementarities, STEM

New evidence on the durability of social norms

John Helliwell, Shun Wang, Jinwen Xu 12 March 2014

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Recent studies find that individuals’ social norms – as evidenced by their opinions and behaviour – can be transmitted from one generation to the next within the same cultural setting (Algan and Cahuc 2010, Bjørnskov 2012, Dohmen et al. 2012, Guiso et al. 2006, Rainer and Siedler 2009, Rice and Feldman 1997). Studies also find that the current environment – such as institutions – plays an important role in shaping an individual’s social norms (Dinesen 2012, Nannestad et al. 2014, Alesina and La Ferrara 2002, Bjørnskov 2007, Glaeser et al. 2000, Helliwell and Wang 2011, Kosfeld et al.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Migration

Tags:  institutions, immigration, social attitudes, trust, migration, Culture, social norms

Migration and wage dynamics: Evidence from the Mexican peso crisis

Joan Monras 22 December 2013

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Despite the large inflows of immigrants experienced in a number of OECD countries, there is no consensus among economists about the causal effect of low-skilled immigration on native labour market outcomes. The reason is simple. Migrants decide when and where to go, and the implied changes in labour market outcomes determines how natives respond to immigration inflows. Overcoming this reverse causality problem is difficult. A natural experiment turns out to help.

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Topics:  Labour markets Migration

Tags:  immigration, peso crisis

The fiscal effects of immigration to the UK

Christian Dustmann, Tommaso Frattini 13 November 2013

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The impact of immigration on the tax and welfare system and the net fiscal consequences is perhaps the single most prominent economic issue in the public debate over the pros and cons of immigration.

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Topics:  Migration Welfare state and social Europe

Tags:  welfare state, immigration, migration, benefits, UK, fiscal burden

Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally, Shqiponja Telhaj 14 September 2013

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In the UK, as in other countries, there has been a rapid increase in the number of non-native speakers. In England the number of non-native speakers has increased by a third in the last decade. Now, roughly one in nine children between the ages of five and 11 do not speak English as a first language. A significant driver of this change has been immigration, though the trend has also been influenced by higher birth rates among ethnic minority groups.

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Topics:  Education

Tags:  immigration, UK

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