The audit society and its enemies

Niklas Bengtsson, Per Engström 28 October 2014

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In the second season of The Wire, thirteen dead women are discovered in a cargo container in Baltimore. Being a case with a low probability of being solved, the different managers of the police force immediately start arguing over which department is responsible for investigating the issue. The incentives are clear – whoever gets the case will have poor statistics to show when the management of the department is audited at the end of the year. The consequence is bribes, corruption, and a dysfunctional police force.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research

Tags:  agency, motivation, motivation crowding-out, intrinsic motivation, incentives, performance-related pay, trust, audits, Sweden, non-profits, charity

Trust-based working time spurs innovation

Holger Görg, Olivier N. Godart, Aoife Hanley, Christiane Krieger-Boden 08 July 2014

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The organisation of work has changed dramatically over the last few decades. In particular, the formerly rigidly regulated working time has been replaced by flexible working hour schemes in numerous firms around the world. Taking Germany as an example, in 2010, 36% of employees were entitled to some form of flexible working hours scheme (Figure 1).

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Topics:  Health economics Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  Germany, working hours, trust, health, innovation, motivation, overtime, flexibility, working time

Are workers motivated by the greater good? Evidence from a field experiment

Mirco Tonin, Michael Vlassopoulos 28 May 2010

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What motivates workers? The canonical view in economics is that workers respond to monetary incentives. In line with this perspective, a large literature has been devoted to analysing how compensation contracts should be designed in order to induce workers to be more productive (Prendergast 1999).

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  gender gap, motivation, field experiment

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