Competing successfully in a globalising world: Lessons from Lancashire

Nicholas Crafts, Nikolaus Wolf, 22 October 2013

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The ‘first globalisation’ of the 19th century – driven by the substantial falls in trade costs associated with the age of steam – saw the ‘First Unbundling’ (Baldwin 2006), in which industrial production and consumption became spatially separated, often by large distances.

Topics: Economic history, International trade
Tags: agglomeration, cities, cotton, globalisation, Industrial Revolution, industrialisation, Lancashire, trade, wages

Doing Business – less icing, more cake!

Thorsten Beck, 6 June 2013

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The World Bank Group’s Doing Business data collection and ranking exercise is again in the headlines, allegedly following China’s protest against it being ranked 91.

Topics: Development, Frontiers of economic research
Tags: Doing Business, trade

The transatlantic trade talks and economic policy research: Time to re-tool

Simon J Evenett, Robert M. Stern, 21 March 2013

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“And tonight, I am announcing that we will launch talks on a comprehensive Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership with the European Union – because trade that is free and fair across the Atlantic supports millions of good-paying American jobs”.

Topics: International trade
Tags: EU, trade, Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, US

Growth dynamics and policy choices facing Indonesia

Ganeshan Wignaraja , 21 February 2013

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Growth slowed in Indonesia in 2012, indicating that the global financial crisis and economic slowdown had indeed had an effect on ASEAN’s biggest economy. Indonesia grew at 6.2% in 2012, down slightly from 6.5% in 2011. Overall, this remains a respectable figure. Bear in mind that Indonesia's annual average growth in the previous decade was below 6% (see Figure 1).

Topics: Development, Politics and economics
Tags: East Asia, natural resources, state capitalism, trade

‘No gain without pain’: Antidumping protection hurts exports

Hylke Vandenbussche, Jozef Konings, 30 January 2013

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Protection is often viewed as a powerful instrument to help domestic firms to raise their sales at the expense of foreign importers. But this view is now being challenged by recent research showing that the effects of protection really depend on the international orientation of the firms i.e. whether they are exporters or not.

Topics: International trade
Tags: EU, France, global value chains, protectionism, tariffs, trade

Exchange-rate volatility is a problem for trade … especially when financial development is low

Jérôme Héricourt, Sandra Poncet, 19 January 2013

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The increasing volatility of exchange rates after the fall of the Bretton Woods agreements has been a constant source of concern for both policymakers and academics.

Topics: Exchange rates, International trade
Tags: China, exchange-rate volatility, trade

Moving to Greenland in the face of global warming

Klaus Desmet, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg , 16 January 2013

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If populations don’t move, global warming is likely to have disastrous consequences.

Topics: Environment, Migration
Tags: climate change, migration, trade

Africa can help feed Africa: Removing barriers to regional trade in food staples

Paul Brenton, 8 January 2013

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Africa is not achieving its potential in food trade.

Growing demand for food in Africa is increasingly being met by imports from the global market. This, coupled with rising global food prices, is leading to ever mounting food import bills. Clearly something has to change. Business as usual with regard to food staples in Africa is not sustainable.

Topics: International trade
Tags: Africa, food, trade

US votes on trade and migration

Paola Conconi, Giovanni Facchini, Max Friedrich Steinhardt, Maurizio Zanardi, 7 January 2013

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In the recent US presidential election, Latino voters rewarded President Obama and punished Republicans for their positions on immigration.

Topics: International trade, Labour markets, Migration
Tags: migration, skilled labour, trade, unskilled labour, US

China’s pure exporter subsidies: Protectionism by exporting

Fabrice Defever, Alejandro Riaño, 4 January 2013

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On 17 September last year, the US requested consultations with China concerning a wide range of export-contingent measures – grants, tax preferences and interest-rate subsidies, totalling at least $1 billion – in apparent violation of the WTO’s Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures, China’s accession protocol and article XVI of the GATT.

Topics: International trade
Tags: China, trade, welfare, WTO

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