Thorvaldur Gylfason, Per Wijkman, 04 November 2012

Today, most of Europe is free from dictatorships and conflict. Yet, these spectres loom in neighbouring states and nearby regions. This column suggests that this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, awarded to the EU, was perhaps a call to action. Can the EU, preoccupied as it is with a growing Eurozone crisis, encourage peace and democracy in its neighbourhood? And what are the lessons we can learn from recent EU policy history?

Monica Eaton, Michael Ferrantino, 04 September 2012

The Eurozone debt crisis is not simply a problem for industrialised countries. This column shows how its effects are being felt throughout Africa.

Oleg Itskhoki, Marc Muendler, Stephen Redding, Elhanan Helpman, 20 May 2012

What is the effect of trade on inequality? This column presents a unique study examining wage inequality in Brazil after liberalisation. Starting from a closed economy, the column finds that wage inequality will initially rise as only some firms take advantage of the new opportunities. But as trade costs continue to fall and more firms start to trade, wage inequality peaks and begins to fall back.

The Editors, 30 June 2011

This CEPR/World Bank volume seeks to facilitate, and in the process develop methodologies for, a rigorous impact evaluation of trade-related interventions.

Simon Evenett, 20 July 2011

The 9th GTA report shows that the pick-up in protectionism since the Seoul G20 summit coincides with the deterioration in economic sentiment.

Nicholas Bloom, Mirko Draca, John Van Reenen, 03 February 2011

Chinese exports are often blamed for job losses and firm closures in developed economies. This column tracks the performance of more than half a million manufacturing firms in 12 European countries over the past decade. It finds that competition with Chinese exports is directly responsible for around 15% of technical change and an annual benefit of almost €10 billion in these countries – the wider productivity effects may well be larger.

Bernard Hoekman, Aaditya Mattoo, 24 December 2010

Trade in services is blighted by restrictive policy and is consequently one of the central issues in the Doha trade negotiations. Yet this column argues that even the best offers put forward are twice as restrictive as current policy and will generate no additional market openings. This column provides two proposals that aim to enhance the prospects of correcting this.

David O'Sullivan, 17 September 2010

David O’Sullivan, Director General for Trade at the European Commission, talks to Viv Davies about the issues and challenges in setting the direction for future EU trade policy. As a contribution to the VoxEU debate on "The future of EU trade policy", O’Sullivan discusses the EU’s responsibility within the world trading system, trade governance and the WTO, the role of reciprocity, the BRICs and the importance of successfully concluding the Doha Development Agenda; he also comments on the issue of ‘multilateralising regionalism’. The interview was recorded on 15 September 2010.

Lucian Cernat, Bertin Martens, 07 May 2010

The EU and US are huge, quite open markets, but many barriers to doing business across the Atlantic remain. This column argues for creating a transatlantic marketplace by reducing regulatory barriers. The EU and US are already regulatory standard setters. Creating a transatlantic market with harmonised regulation would strongly reinforce this global regulatory leadership role.

Simon Evenett, 18 February 2010

The latest GTA report examines whether macroeconomic stabilisation has altered governments' resort to protectionism, with a focus on the Gulf Region.

Simon Evenett, 14 December 2009

The third report of Global Trade Alert contains the latest assessment of protectionist dynamics at work in the world economy with a focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

Simon Evenett, 14 December 2009

The latest Report from Global Trade Alert focuses on the Asia-Pacific region.

Caroline Freund, Nadia Rocha, 11 December 2009

It has been shown that poor trade infrastructure is a key reason for Africa's weak exports. This column goes a step further and provides evidence that the delays in inland transport are the most crucial factor restricting Sub-Saharan Africa's trade. Policy makers’ focus on foreign trade policy may therefore be misguided.

Simon Evenett, Bernard Hoekman, 06 July 2009

For most nations in the world, this is a trade crisis. Leaving China and India aside, income of developing nations is expected to drop 1.6% this year, even though these nations had nothing to do with subprime assets or the financial shenanigans that triggered the crisis. A new CEPR-World Bank e-book reports that protectionism is not yet a problem, but argues that the “fateful allure of protectionism” is a threat. To counter the threat, four concrete steps should be taken to reinforce the global trade and financial architecture.

Gary Hufbauer, Sherry Stephenson, 11 May 2009

A new CEPR Policy Insight looks at whether a change in developing countries' trade policy might relieve some of the pain from the current crisis.

Richard Baldwin, 04 April 2009

G20 leaders made a number of commitments on trade in their London Communiqué. This column argues that the anti-protection pledge is more credible than the one agreed in the Washington Declaration. The commitment on the Doha Round, by contrast, was pitiful.

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In the fall of 2008, the world financial system seems on the verge of collapse. A decade earlier, the crisis in East Asia affected the lives of millions overnight. Dramatic changes in China and India have a severe impact on the world economy. While living standards in some developing countries have improved, poverty remains rampant in many. These are some of the serious economic challenges facing the world. Everywhere, development organizations, NGOs, government agencies, central banks, and investment banks are looking for experts who can apply cutting-edge analysis to solve such problems. The program combines rigorous analytical training with a strong focus on policy. For more information, visit www.barcelonagse.eu/ITFD.html

Gary Hufbauer, Jeffrey Schott, 05 February 2009

The “Buy American” provision in the US stimulus package would violate US trade obligations, damage the US' reputation, and have almost no real impact on US jobs. Moreover, the provisions will be read as an Obama trade policy that leans toward protectionism – with severe consequences abroad.

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CEPR and the Paris School of Economics are jointly organizing (with financial assistance from Agence Nationale pour la Recherche, ANR) a one and a half day workshop focusing on conflicts, globalization and development. The workshop will take place at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne campus of the Paris School of Economics. Papers are being sought that focus on the following topics: · Causes and consequences of violent conflicts: civil wars, interstate wars, terrorism, rebellion... · Arms trade · International trade, capital flows and violent conflicts · Institutions and violent conflicts · Multilateral institutions and conflicts . Political versus economic causes of conflicts...

Gabriel Felbermayr, Farid Toubal, 19 July 2008

This column introduces the use of Eurovision song contest scores as a measure of cultural proximity. Unlike other measures, such as common language or religion, Eurovision scores are asymmetric and time-varying, allowing estimates to distinguish between two potential channels through which cultural proximity might affect trade: trade costs and consumer preferences.

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