Equilibrium fictions, societal rigidity, and affirmative action

Karla Hoff 24 April 2012

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India’s experience with quotas for women in public office suggests that within a generation, exposure to women leaders can erase the bias in men’s evaluation of female compared to male leaders and lift parents’ and girls’ aspirations by enough to close the gender gap in literacy (Beaman et al. 2009, 2012). Yet affirmative action sits uneasily with the values of individualism. Some argue that affirmative action aims to right a wrong against one group by a policy that wrongs a different group. Since two wrongs don’t make a right, affirmative action makes no sense.

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Topics:  Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  affirmative action, India, race, sexism, caste

Shaping risk preferences across time

Alison Booth, Patrick Nolen, Lina Cardona Sosa 20 February 2012

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The majority of experimental studies investigating gender differences in risky choices find that women are less willing to take risks than men. This research is summarised in Eckel and Grossman (2008) and Croson and Gneezy (2009). However, these experimental studies investigating gender differences in risky choices typically do so only at a single point in time.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Gender Labour markets

Tags:  competition, risk aversion, sexism

Does gender matter for academic promotion? Evidence from a randomised natural experiment

Natalia Zinovyeva, Manuel F. Bagues 19 December 2010

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Women have historically been under-represented in top academic positions. For years, this under-representation was partly the result of the smaller number of women obtaining doctorates. Currently, women account for about half of PhD graduates, but the increased presence of women at the lower rungs of the academic ladder has not translated into proportional increases in the presence of women at the top, particularly among full professors. For instance, in Spain, the presence of women among PhD graduates has grown from 36% to 49% over the last 20 years.

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Topics:  Global governance

Tags:  gender, academia, sexism

Can gender differences in competition explain the achievement gap?

Christopher Cotton, Frank McIntyre, Joseph Price 21 October 2010

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Last week the World Economic Forum released its Global Gender Gap Report (Hausmann et al. 2010). As expected, the data in the report illustrates a significant and persistent pay and achievement gap between males and females around the world.

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  Labour Markets, competition, Discrimination, gender gap, sexism