Gender diversity in management in Japan is finally emerging: Comparison with China and South Korea

Hiromi Ishizuka, 10 July 2014

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Japan was ranked 104th out of 136 countries on the World Economic Forum (WEF)’s Global Gender Gap sub-index on economic participation and opportunity in 2013. This means that Japan has the second largest labour market gender gap among the advanced economies, next only to South Korea. Meanwhile, Japan’s population peaked in 2008 and has been on the decline since.

Topics: Gender, Labour markets
Tags: Gender diversity, Japan, Management

Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa, 19 June 2014

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The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: centralisation, headquarters, ICT, Japan, Management, productivity, technology

Do we need highly cited departmental chairs?

Amanda Goodall, John McDowell, Larry Singell, 31 January 2014

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The advancement of scientific knowledge is the primary responsibility of approximately 300,000 academic departments housed in more than 20,000 universities worldwide, yet little is known about the factors that determine the productivity of those departments. chairs – or ‘Heads of Department’ – play a central role in the academic departments that make up universities.

Topics: Education
Tags: academia, higher education, Management, Universities

Productivity in Italy: The great unlearning

Fadi Hassan, Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 30 November 2013

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Italy is often regarded as the sleeping beauty of Europe -- a country rich in talent and history, but suffering from a long-lasting stagnation. Italian per-capita income as percentage of the EU15 average has steadily declined since 1994, reaching 84% of EU15 average in 2012. However, this pattern is a novelty compared to previous decades.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: ICT investment, Italy, Management, productivity

Managing bureaucrats

Imran Rasul, Daniel Rogger, 19 November 2013

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Since its inception in the 1850s, the British Civil Service has become a cornerstone of the executive branch of the UK government, translating the policy programme of the government into practice.

Topics: Development, Institutions and economics, Politics and economics
Tags: Africa, bureaucracy, civil service, incentives, Management, monitoring, Nigeria

Herding cats? Management and university performance

John McCormack, Carol Propper, Sarah Smith, 7 November 2013

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The common view holds that managing academics is like herding cats – difficult and ultimately pointless. But this view of management contrasts with growing evidence that good management practices are like a good technology – they increase productivity (Bloom and Van Reenen 2010).

Topics: Education, Labour markets
Tags: academia, higher education, human resources, Management, Universities

High-involvement management: What does it mean for worker wellbeing?

Alex Bryson, 21 October 2011

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Solving the world’s problems – everything ranging from productivity growth and employment creation to ageing and climate change – will require firms to get better at what they do. Modern management techniques are increasingly looking like they will help deliver on the necessity.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: Finland, Management, wellbeing

How do CEOs spend their time?

Andrea Prat, Oriana Bandiera, Luigi Guiso, Raffaella Sadun, 28 May 2011

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Corporate leadership attracts enormous attention, both from scholars and from the public. Yet, despite this strong interest, very little is known on what activities leaders engage in. Most texts that purport to define and explain the role of corporate leaders are based on a small amount of evidence, often just a single case.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: CEOs, Management

Time and work at the Bank of England

Anne Murphy, 22 May 2011

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In 1783 the Bank of England appointed a Committee of Inspection to examine working practices within its departments and identify any failings in procedures. The committee spent a year interviewing the clerks and observing them at work.

Topics: Labour markets, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: Bank of England, economic history, Management, productivity

“The Office” goes to India: Why bad management is keeping India poor

Nicholas Bloom, Aprajit Mahajan, David McKenzie, John Roberts, 13 April 2011

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Anyone who has seen the TV show “The Office” knows about the impact of bad management on office productivity. David Brent (Michael Scott in the US version) is the notoriously incompetent manager who can do nothing right. Everything he touches goes wrong. Bad managers are also presumably a global problem: “The Office” has been exported to over 50 countries.

Topics: Development, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: development, India, Management