We don’t need no (management) education?

Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen 07 December 2014

a

A

Surely the only thing more painful than teaching a Friday afternoon maths class to restless teenagers is subjecting teachers to ‘learnings’ in management gobbledygook from a pimply consultant straight from university.

a

A

Topics:  Education

Tags:  education, schools, charter schools, Management, management quality, accountability, governance, teaching

Employee satisfaction and firm value: A global perspective

Alex Edmans 25 July 2014

a

A

Is employee satisfaction good or bad for firm value? While it may seem natural that companies should do better if their workers are happier, this relationship is far from obvious. The 20th-century way of managing workers (e.g. Taylor 1911) is to view them as any other input – just as managers shouldn’t overpay for or underutilise raw materials, they shouldn’t do so with workers. High worker satisfaction may be a sign that workers are overpaid or underworked. However, the world is different nowadays.

a

A

Topics:  Labour markets Microeconomic regulation Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  employment, Labour Markets, productivity, Management, happiness, Stock returns, labour-market flexibility, employment protection, work, employee satisfaction, worker satisfaction, profits, labour-market regulation

Gender diversity in management in Japan is finally emerging: Comparison with China and South Korea

Hiromi Ishizuka 10 July 2014

a

A

Japan was ranked 104th out of 136 countries on the World Economic Forum (WEF)’s Global Gender Gap sub-index on economic participation and opportunity in 2013. This means that Japan has the second largest labour market gender gap among the advanced economies, next only to South Korea. Meanwhile, Japan’s population peaked in 2008 and has been on the decline since. As such, high hopes are being pinned on women as a potential workforce and also as the gender that can give birth.

a

A

Topics:  Gender Labour markets

Tags:  Management, Japan, Gender diversity

Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa 19 June 2014

a

A

The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

a

A

Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  productivity, Management, ICT, Japan, technology, headquarters, centralisation

Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa 26 August 2014

a

A

The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

a

A

Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  productivity, Management, ICT, Japan, technology, headquarters, centralisation

Do we need highly cited departmental chairs?

Amanda Goodall, John McDowell, Larry Singell 31 January 2014

a

A

The advancement of scientific knowledge is the primary responsibility of approximately 300,000 academic departments housed in more than 20,000 universities worldwide, yet little is known about the factors that determine the productivity of those departments. chairs – or ‘Heads of Department’ – play a central role in the academic departments that make up universities. They manage daily operations, hire faculty and professional staff, and work closely with senior university administrators, most of whom were themselves once departmental heads.

a

A

Topics:  Education

Tags:  Universities, Management, higher education, academia

Productivity in Italy: The great unlearning

Fadi Hassan, Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano 30 November 2013

a

A

Italy is often regarded as the sleeping beauty of Europe -- a country rich in talent and history, but suffering from a long-lasting stagnation. Italian per-capita income as percentage of the EU15 average has steadily declined since 1994, reaching 84% of EU15 average in 2012. However, this pattern is a novelty compared to previous decades. Italy was the best growth performer among major European partners in the 70s and 80s, but in the 90s and the 2000s it turned to be the worst performer. Why did that happen?

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  Italy, productivity, Management, ICT investment

Managing bureaucrats

Imran Rasul, Daniel Rogger 19 November 2013

a

A

Since its inception in the 1850s, the British Civil Service has become a cornerstone of the executive branch of the UK government, translating the policy programme of the government into practice. Its practices have evolved gradually over the decades, but it is now in the midst of a major upheaval – in 2012, the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Head of the Civil Service jointly published the Civil Service Reform Plan. The plan recognised the increased expectations on government to deliver public services in the context of perhaps permanently diminished government resources.

a

A

Topics:  Development Institutions and economics Politics and economics

Tags:  Africa, Management, incentives, Nigeria, bureaucracy, civil service, monitoring

Herding cats? Management and university performance

John McCormack, Carol Propper, Sarah Smith 07 November 2013

a

A

The common view holds that managing academics is like herding cats – difficult and ultimately pointless. But this view of management contrasts with growing evidence that good management practices are like a good technology – they increase productivity (Bloom and Van Reenen 2010). Further, this finding holds for organisations in the public sector as well as in the private sector, and in many different countries across the world (Bloom et al. 2012).

a

A

Topics:  Education Labour markets

Tags:  Universities, Management, higher education, academia, human resources

High-involvement management: What does it mean for worker wellbeing?

Alex Bryson 21 October 2011

a

A

Solving the world’s problems – everything ranging from productivity growth and employment creation to ageing and climate change – will require firms to get better at what they do. Modern management techniques are increasingly looking like they will help deliver on the necessity.

There is a growing body of evidence indicating that certain modern management practices increase firm profitability – specifically practices known as 'high-involvement management'. They were given this name since they work by engaging workers more fully in their jobs.

a

A

Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  Management, wellbeing, Finland

Pages