Football in the time of protest

Nauro F Campos 13 June 2014

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Football is actually coming home. Brazil is the spiritual home of the ‘beautiful game’. It is the only country to have competed in all 20 World Cup tournaments, it has won the tournament a record five times, and it is the only country to have won the tournament ‘away’ (Ponzo and Scoppa 2014).1 Brazilians worship football. As in all previous World Cups, the country will stop when the Seleção plays. Unlike all other Cups, however, this time there may be protests.

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Topics:  Institutions and economics Politics and economics

Tags:  Corruption, Political Economy, soccer, rent-seeking, Football, Brazil, infrastructure, sport, protests, FIFA

Financial foul play? An analysis of UEFA’s attempts to restore financial discipline in European football

Rob Simmons 03 September 2012

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As the 2012/13 football season kicks off, many fans, journalists, and social commentators will be heard saying that: a) the gap in financial resources between large and small clubs is greater than ever, b) star players at big clubs such as Barcelona, Chelsea, Real Madrid, Manchester City and Manchester United earn exorbitant salaries, and c) the finances of several clubs are out of control, as clubs that are hungry for success generate large financial losses as their spending levels on transfer fees and player salaries are driven up.

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Topics:  Competition policy Frontiers of economic research

Tags:  competition, Football, sport, Financial Fair Play

The behavioural economics of exercise habits

Jeremy D Goldhaber-Fiebert, Alan M Garber 22 February 2011

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In the US, obesity – and the chronic diseases it can cause – is putting health policy under enormous strain (Flegal et al. 2010). One recent study finds that between 1993 and 2008 obesity was a greater threat to the health of Americans than smoking (Jia and Lubetkin 2010). But it is not just the US. The rise in hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease may have been most pronounced in the developed world, but many rapidly developing countries including India and China are now following this disturbing trend (Sugerman et al. 2003 and Mathers et al. 2006).

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Health economics

Tags:  health, Behavioural economics, sport, exercise habits

The economics of the 2022 FIFA World Cup

Syed Basher 24 December 2010

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FIFA’s surprising decision to award Qatar the 2022 World Cup drew plenty of mixed emotions from around the world. Now that the excitement has subsided, plenty of work lies ahead as Qatar prepares to host. Over the next decade, Qatar ambitiously plans to build sophisticated air-conditioned stadiums, a mega size airport, a modern public transportation system, residential housing units, hotels, roads, and many more, at an estimated cost of $100 billion. The bulk of this outlay will be spent over the next couple of years when contracts for the above projects will be awarded.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  inflation, World Cup, sport

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