Who is to blame for the credit crunch: foreign ownership or foreign funding?

Erik Feyen, Raquel Letelier, Inessa Love, Samuel Munzele Maimbo, Roberto Rocha, 15 March 2014

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From boom to crunch

Although most developing countries around the world experienced a severe contraction of bank credit during the recent global financial crisis, the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (ECA) region was disproportionately hit after it had experienced very high credit growth (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Banking system trends in ECA

Topics: Financial markets, Global crisis, International finance
Tags: banking, Central Asia, Credit crunch, credit growth, cross-border banking, Eastern Europe, global financial crisis

A new eReport: Excessive risk-taking by banks

Richard Baldwin, 30 March 2012

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For many, the global crisis was caused by the interlinked fragilities that arose in the banking and financial sectors; these themselves were created by mindless deregulation and permissive monetary policy. By the late 2000s, the system was so precarious that shocks from many directions could have triggered the economic conflagration we witnessed.

Topics: Global crisis, Global economy, Microeconomic regulation
Tags: cross-border banking, macroprudential regulation, risk-taking

Home bias and the credit crunch: Evidence from Italy

Andrea F Presbitero, Gregory F Udell, Alberto Zazzaro, 12 February 2012

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The management of the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis will have significant effects on the stability of national banking systems, as argued in some recent Vox columns (Acharya et al 2011, Wyplosz 2011).

Topics: Financial markets
Tags: banks, Credit crunch, cross-border banking, Italy

Foreign banks and the global financial crisis: Investment and lending behaviour

Stijn Claessens, Neeltje van Horen, 31 January 2012

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Foreign banks have in many countries become important sources of financial intermediation. Given this importance, understanding the impact of the financial crisis on foreign-bank behaviour is important. Questions being asked include:

Topics: Global crisis, International finance
Tags: cross-border banking, foreign banks, global crisis, investment

Foreign banks: Trends and impact on financial development

Stijn Claessens, Neeltje van Horen, 28 January 2012

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Although interrupted by the recent financial crisis, the past two decades have seen an unprecedented degree of globalisation, especially in financial services. Cross-border bank and other capital flows have increased dramatically. Many banks have ventured abroad and established a presence in other countries.

Topics: Development, International finance
Tags: cross-border banking, development, foreign banks

Coordinating bank-failure costs and financial stability

Iman van Lelyveld, Marco Spaltro, 27 October 2011

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During the financial crisis, failure or distress of cross-border firms has been met by ad hoc coordinated solutions (eg Fortis and Dexia) or national solutions (eg UK and US banks).

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Global crisis, International finance
Tags: bank resolution, burden-sharing, cross-border banking, Eurozone crisis, financial stability

The future of cross-border banking

Dirk Schoenmaker, 25 October 2011

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International trade and multinational business operations have traditionally been facilitated by international banks.

Topics: International finance
Tags: cross-border banking, decoupling

Cross-Border Banking in Europe: Implications for Financial Stability and Macroeconomic Policies

Thorsten Beck, Wolf Wagner, Philip Lane, Dirk Schoenmaker, Elena Carletti, Franklin Allen, 20 June 2011

Cross-Border Banking in Europe: Implications for Financial Stability and Macroeconomic Policies

by Franklin Allen, Thorsten Beck, Elena Carletti, Philip R. Lane, Dirk Schoenmaker and Wolf Wagner

URL: http://www.cepr.org/pubs/books/CEPR/booklist.asp?cvno=P223
Topics: EU policies, Financial markets, Global crisis
Tags: cross-border banking, Europe, macro-prudential regulation, micro-prudential regulation

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