Globalisation promotes peace

Ju Hyun Pyun, Jong-Wha Lee, 21 March 2009

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"Since Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse have wrecked their havoc on mankind." Thus did the late Herschel Grossman begin his 2003 Timlin lecture; he was referring to the biblical ravages – famine, disease, natural disaster, and war.

Topics: International trade
Tags: bilateral trade, Conflicts, trade openness

What India must do to modernise

Arvind Panagariya, 15 January 2008

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A key advantage claimed for the outward-oriented development strategy is that it allows poor, labour-abundant countries to specialise in labour-intensive products and, thus make efficient use of limited capital stocks. To quote Anne O.

Topics: Development
Tags: China, India, labour-intensive sectors, manufacturing, modernization, trade openness

Civil war: Does international trade help or hurt?

Philippe Martin, Thierry Mayer, Mathias Thoenig, 4 January 2008

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Even though the number of violent conflicts has decreased since a peak in 1992, civil war remains an endemic form of violence in poor countries. With the end of the Cold War, democratisation and increased integration in the world economy have often been advocated in order to promote prosperity and peace in poor countries.

Topics: International trade, Politics and economics
Tags: civil war, international trade, trade openness

Openness to trade and industry productivity dispersion

Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 31 July 2007

Europe is supposed to become the world’s most competitive knowledge-based economy. Improving Europe’s competitiveness is a complex and elusive task. Improving the competitiveness of Europe’s firms, by contrast, is a concrete goal.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/pubs/PolicyInsights/CEPR_Policy_Insight_008.asp
Topics: International trade
Tags: competitiveness, total factor productivity, trade openness

Openness to trade and industry productivity dispersion

Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 31 July 2007

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A

Europe is supposed to become the world’s most competitive knowledge-based economy. Improving Europe’s competitiveness is a complex and elusive task. Improving the competitiveness of Europe’s firms, by contrast, is a concrete goal.

Topics: International trade
Tags: competitiveness, total factor productivity, trade openness

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