Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa 19 June 2014

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The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  productivity, Management, ICT, Japan, technology, headquarters, centralisation

Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa 26 August 2014

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The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  productivity, Management, ICT, Japan, technology, headquarters, centralisation

Good technology, bad technology: How Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) benefit some workers and harm others

Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, John Van Reenen, Raffaella Sadun 04 December 2013

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A century ago, an ambassador to a distant nation would operate as a ‘viceroy,’ empowered to make decisions up to matters of war and peace. Declines in communication costs have transformed this once powerful office into a glorified sales position, requiring attendance at parties but no decisions of import.

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Topics:  Industrial organisation

Tags:  ICT, routine and non-routine skills

New technology in schools: is there a payoff?

Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Olmo Silva 14 December 2007

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The view that information and communication technologies (ICT) are a useful tool for raising educational standards dates back to the 1950s and the findings of Harvard psychologist BF Skinner.1 More recently, support for the effectiveness of ICT as a teaching and learning device has come from the educational and psychological literature (recently reviewed by Heather Kirkpatrick and Larry Cuban),2 which tends to make enthusiastic claims for the value of new technology in schools.

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Topics:  Education

Tags:  education, ICT, schools

The geographic concentration of services today mirrors that of manufacturing a century ago

Klaus Desmet, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg 12 October 2007

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In the last two decades, rapid improvements in Information and Communications Technology – ICT – has wrought enormous change on the world. As with other so-called general purpose technologies, its productivity impact was initially not much felt. As Solow quipped in 1987, computers were everywhere “except in the productivity statistics”. But with the passing of time, the potential of ICT unfolded. The productivity figures started to pick up. One concrete example of the benefits from ICT is the recent growth in outsourcing and offshoring of different tasks.

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  ICT, spatial concentration, 'death of distance'

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