Are large headquarters unproductive?

Masayuki Morikawa, 19 June 2014

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The role of headquarters

Headquarters – the core service sector inside companies – conduct a wide range of highly strategic activities, including:

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: centralisation, headquarters, ICT, Japan, Management, productivity, technology

Good technology, bad technology: How Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) benefit some workers and harm others

Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, John Van Reenen, Raffaella Sadun, 4 December 2013

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A century ago, an ambassador to a distant nation would operate as a ‘viceroy,’ empowered to make decisions up to matters of war and peace. Declines in communication costs have transformed this once powerful office into a glorified sales position, requiring attendance at parties but no decisions of import.

Topics: Industrial organisation
Tags: ICT, routine and non-routine skills

New technology in schools: is there a payoff?

Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Olmo Silva , 14 December 2007

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The view that information and communication technologies (ICT) are a useful tool for raising educational standards dates back to the 1950s and the findings of Harvard psychologist BF Skinner.1 More recently, support for the effectiveness of ICT as a teaching and learning device has come from the educational and psychological literature (recently reviewed by Heathe

Topics: Education
Tags: education, ICT, schools

The geographic concentration of services today mirrors that of manufacturing a century ago

Klaus Desmet, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg , 12 October 2007

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In the last two decades, rapid improvements in Information and Communications Technology – ICT – has wrought enormous change on the world. As with other so-called general purpose technologies, its productivity impact was initially not much felt. As Solow quipped in 1987, computers were everywhere “except in the productivity statistics”.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: 'death of distance', ICT, spatial concentration

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