The persistence of consumption habits

Lorenz Kueng, Evgeny Yakovlev 10 September 2014

a

A

Understanding consumption behaviour of individuals and households is crucial for many economic questions, particularly for those with policy implications. For instance, given that consumption is the largest component of aggregate demand in most economies, it is important for policymakers to understand how consumers respond to changes in their economic environment – so called ‘shocks’ –  including those caused by new policies.

a

A

Topics:  Health economics Microeconomic regulation

Tags:  consumption habits, Alcohol consumption, substitution, Russia

Putin’s endgame

Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Gérard Roland 04 September 2014

a

A

There is plenty of evidence that Russian troops are fighting the Ukrainian army on Ukrainian soil. This Russian invasion is a further escalation of the war between Ukraine and Russian-sponsored separatists and terrorists in the east of Ukraine. As soon as the Ukrainian forces were about to take over cities in eastern Ukraine, Mr Putin raised the stakes and sent Russian military to rescue the separatists from certain defeat. Both sides have experienced heavy losses, but the Russian government denies any involvement. The excuses sound increasingly surreal (e.g.

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions

Tags:  Russia, Ukraine crisis

Europe’s Russian connections

Aasim M. Husain, Anna Ilyina, Li Zeng 29 August 2014

a

A

The conflict in Ukraine and the imposition of new sanctions against Russia by the US and the EU (second half of July) followed by Russia's counter-sanctions (August 7) signal an escalation of geopolitical tensions that has been strongly felt in Russian financial markets (see Chart 1). A deterioration in the conflict, as well as further escalation of sanctions and counter-sanctions, could have a substantial adverse impact on the Russian economy through direct and indirect (confidence) channels (IMF 2014a).

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Politics and economics

Tags:  Russia, sanctions, Eastern Europe

A way out of the Ukrainian quagmire

Thorvaldur Gylfason, Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, Per Magnus Wijkman 14 June 2014

a

A

At the Vilnius Summit in November 2013, President Yanukovich chose not to sign the Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement (DCFTA) with the EU that Ukraine had spent five years negotiating.1 His decision was dictated both by Ukraine’s failure to fulfil the political conditions for signature set by the EU and by strong pressure by Russia on Ukraine to join the Eurasian Customs Union instead.2 His refusal to sign unleashed events in Ukraine that within six months led to the President’s flight to Russia, the installation of a new pr

a

A

Topics:  EU policies Europe's nations and regions International trade

Tags:  Russia, EU, civil war, free trade agreements, Ukraine, diplomacy

Russia’s tit for tat

Peter A.G. van Bergeijk 25 April 2014

a

A

Since 16 March 2014, the EU (in concerted action with the US) has frozen assets and imposed travel bans on 33 persons and an individual bank. On 20 March, Russia counteracted with the reciprocal blacklisting of EU and US officials. This pattern of tit for tat raises the question of the comparative vulnerability of the EU and Russia. In assessing this vulnerability, is not just the ability to inflict economic damage that matters, however, but also the way economic damage translates into political change. This means that one needs to consider the political system.

a

A

Topics:  Politics and economics

Tags:  Russia, EU, sanctions, Crimean crisis

Russian volatility: Obstacle to firm survival and diversification

Alvaro González, Leonardo Iacovone, Hari Subhash 12 February 2014

a

A

Limited economic diversification – where production is concentrated in sectors characterised by low technology spillovers – can limit productivity growth and expose an economy to the macroeconomic instability of a fate dictated by external events. Moreover, development and diversification appear to be related. Imbs and Wacziarg (2003) show that higher per capita incomes are associated with greater diversification and then with increasing specialisation at higher per capita incomes.

a

A

Topics:  Development Industrial organisation

Tags:  Russia, economic diversification

Meeting Russia’s challenge to EU’s Eastern Partnership

Thorvaldur Gylfason, Per Magnus Wijkman 25 January 2014

a

A

EU’s Eastern Partnership is in turmoil after its Summit in Vilnius on 29 November 2013. Only Georgia and Moldova of the four partner countries that had successfully negotiated Association agreements with the EU, including Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreements (DCFTAs), initialed them at the Summit.1 In September, President Sargsyan, motivated by the threatened loss of Russia’s security guarantee vis-à-vis Azerbaijan, had informed the EU that Armenia would not initial its Association agreement but instead join Russia’s proposed Eurasian Customs Union.

a

A

Topics:  Politics and economics

Tags:  Russia, EU, Ukraine, Eastern Partnership

Was Stalin necessary for Russia’s economic development?

Anton Cheremukhin, Mikhail Golosov, Sergei Guriev, Aleh Tsyvinski 10 October 2013

a

A

In 1962, a prominent British economic historian, Alec Nove, asked whether Russia would have been able to industrialise in the late 1920s and 1930s in the absence of Stalin’s economic policies (Nove 1962). This question is still important for several reasons.

  • The transformation of Soviet Russia from an agrarian to an industrial economy is a key episode in economic and political history.

The industrialised Soviet Union played a key role in the victory over Nazi Germany during WWII and, as one of the two superpowers during the Cold War, reshaped the postwar world.

a

A

Topics:  Development Economic history

Tags:  Russia, Stalin, Soviet Union, industrialisation, collectivisation

The BRICs party is over

Anders Åslund 04 September 2013

a

A

After a decade of infatuation, investors have suddenly turned their backs on emerging markets. In the BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China – growth rates have quickly fallen and current-account balances have deteriorated.1 The surprise is not that the romance is over but that it could have lasted for so long.

From 2000 to 2008 the world went through one of the greatest commodity and credit booms of all times. Goldman Sachs preached that the BRICs were unstoppable (e.g. Wilson and Purushothaman 2003).

a

A

Topics:  Development International trade

Tags:  Russia, China, India, commodities, protectionism, BRICs, Brazil, BRIC

The past in the Polish present

Irena Grosfeld, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya 23 March 2013

a

A

History is vividly present in today’s political debates in Poland. There is a near-consensus among politicians and political commentators that the spatial pattern in voting is determined, to a large extent, by the Partitions of Poland (1772-1918) and the change of boundaries in 1945 that triggered mass migration of the population.

a

A

Topics:  Economic history Frontiers of economic research

Tags:  Russia, Poland, Prussia, Habsburg, Catholic

Pages

Events