Does grief transfer across generations? In-utero deaths and child outcomes

Sandra E. Black, Paul Devereux, Kjell G. Salvanes, 20 August 2014

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What is the effect of stress while pregnant on the health of the baby? This is a question faced by all women – both in developed and developing countries. Indeed, in developed countries, stress may be more prevalent than many physical stressors such as nutritional deficiencies.

Topics: Health economics
Tags: bereavement, grief, health, pregnancy, stress

Do trans-fat bans save lives?

Brandon Restrepo, Matthias Rieger, 16 July 2014

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The use of artificial trans fat or partially hydrogenated oil – which is industrially produced by adding hydrogen gas to liquid vegetable oil – is widespread across the world’s food production chains and service industries. Aside from the fact that it has the same caloric value as any other fat, there are no known health benefits to consuming artificial trans fat.

Topics: Health economics
Tags: cardiovascular disease, diet, food, health, New York, restaurants, trans fat

Trust-based working time spurs innovation

Holger Görg, Olivier N. Godart, Aoife Hanley, Christiane Krieger-Boden, 8 July 2014

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The organisation of work has changed dramatically over the last few decades. In particular, the formerly rigidly regulated working time has been replaced by flexible working hour schemes in numerous firms around the world. Taking Germany as an example, in 2010, 36% of employees were entitled to some form of flexible working hours scheme (Figure 1).

Topics: Health economics, Labour markets, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: flexibility, Germany, health, innovation, motivation, overtime, trust, working hours, working time

Determinants of generic medicine adoption

Joan Costa-i-Font, Alistair McGuire, Nebibe Varol, 10 May 2014

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With healthcare budgets around the world under pressure, switching to generics seems a natural cost saver. Generic drugs are cheaper alternatives to branded medicines, offering an obvious source of efficiency gains to any health system.

Topics: Competition policy, Health economics
Tags: competition, drugs, generics, health, healthcare, medicine, pharmaceuticals, regulation

The great escape from death and deprivation

Angus Deaton, 20 March 2014

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Nearly 40 years ago, the demographer Samuel Preston (1975) wrote about changing patterns of life expectancy and income around the world. That paper set the agenda for thinking about global health and global wealth.

Topics: Development, Politics and economics
Tags: health, inequalities, wealth

Health insurance, innovation, and technology adoption

Joan Costa-i-Font, Alistair McGuire, Victoria Serra-Sastre, 19 January 2013

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With government budgets under pressure in mature economies, burgeoning healthcare expenditures are under scrutiny. In this light, healthcare innovation can either help by developing new cheaper treatments or make healthcare policy decisions more difficult by introducing new, better but more expensive technologies.

Topics: Health economics
Tags: health, research and development, technology

Free to choose?

Marty Gaynor, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler, 13 January 2013

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A central plank of the NHS reforms implemented by the UK Labour government of the 2000s was the introduction of patient choice. For the first time in the history of the NHS it was mandated that patients should have a say in the choice of hospital when being referred for an elective treatment.

Topics: Health economics
Tags: health, NHS, patient choice

Lasting effects of childhood health in developing countries

Janet Currie, Tom Vogl, 15 November 2012

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Longstanding arguments that ill health impedes economic development hit a snag when evidence emerged that the global decline of infectious disease in the mid-20th century did not bring prosperity to the world’s unhealthiest countries (Acemoglu and Johnson 2007).

Topics: Health economics
Tags: birth weight, childhood, health, Height

Are fruit and vegetables good for your mental health as well as your physical health?

Sarah Stewart-Brown, 11 November 2012

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Public health policy has an enormous impact on national wellbeing (Delaney, Smith and McGovern 2011). A study recently published in Social Indicators Research (Blanchflower, Oswald and Stewart-Brown 2012) investigated the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and mental health.

Topics: Health economics
Tags: diet, health, Mental health, mental illness

Who lives longer?

Josep Pijoan-Mas, Víctor Ríos-Rull, 30 September 2012

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Economists have long been worried about income inequality and its effects on welfare. For instance, workers with a college degree earn on average much more than those who did not complete high school. This disparity translates into large differences in consumption levels and hence welfare (see, for instance, Heathcote et al. 2010).

Topics: Education, Health economics, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: education, health, life expectancy, wealth

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