Economic analysis of the US unconventional oil and gas revolution

Mathilde Mathieu, Thomas Spencer, Oliver Sartor, 22 March 2014

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The recent rapid growth in the production of unconventional oil and gas (shale gas and tight oil) in the US has led to a significant decrease of natural gas prices as well as reduced oil imports. This has raised questions about the impacts of the unconventional oil and gas revolution on the US macroeconomy, industrial competitiveness, and energy sector.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: energy, energy independence, environment, fracking, gas, oil, shale gas, tight oil, US

Nuclear expansion or phase-out? Costs and opportunities

Enrica De Cian, Samuel Carrara, Massimo Tavoni, 22 December 2013

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"We learned from Fukushima that we have to deal differently with risks… We believe we as a country can be a trailblazer for a new age of renewable energy sources… We can be the first major industrialized country that achieves the transition to renewable energy with all the opportunities – for exports, development, technology, jobs – it carri

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: carbon pricing, climate change, climate policy, energy, energy mix, environment, nuclear power, R&D

Green growth? Evidence from energy taxes in Europe

Richard S J Tol, Seán Lyons, 12 November 2011

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Politicians around the world like to argue that climate policy will create jobs and stimulate innovation. Such a message is largely unsupported but more palatable than the typical result of academic research that shows that climate policy would increase the costs of energy and slow down economic growth (Clarke et al 2009).

Topics: Energy, Environment, EU policies
Tags: energy, energy taxes, Green growth

Does daylight saving time save electricity?

Matthew J. Kotchen, Laura E. Grant , 5 December 2008

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Each year, 76 countries practice Daylight Saving Time (DST), referred to as Summer Time in the EU. By setting clocks forward one hour in the spring and turning them back one hour in the fall, DST effectively moves an hour of sunlight from morning to evening. The policy directly affects more than 1.6 billion people worldwide, making it among the most widespread regulations on the planet.

Topics: Energy
Tags: daylight saving time, electricity, energy

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