Pedro Carneiro, Costas Meghir, Matthias Parey, 08 October 2007

In the last 50 years, there has been a striking increase in inequality in children’s home environments across families where mothers have different levels of education. Given that the tendency is rooted in the experience of each family, it is difficult for the welfare system to import change and direct interventions require the invasion of family autonomy and privacy. The authors of CEPR DP6505 assess an alternative potential policy, which targets future parents while still in their youth by affecting their education before they start forming a family.

Jan van Ours, Jenny Williams, 18 September 2007

Parents are right to worry about their children's early use of cannabis, at least with respect to educational attainment. Early initiation into cannabis reduces educational attainment considerably.

Julian Le Grand, 24 August 2007

Properly designed public services whose delivery includes elements of choice and competition deliver higher quality and more efficient services, and are both more equitable and more responsive

Ritva Reinikka, Jakob Svensson , 02 July 2007

The Millennium Development Goals call for universal primary school enrolment but still the available literature on schooling provides little guidance on what governments in developing countries should prioritize to raise educational attainment. Innovations in governance of social services may yield the highest return since social services delivery in developing countries is often plagued by inefficiencies and corruption. The authors of DP6363 exploit an unusual policy experiment to answer what may be the most effective way to increase primary school enrolment and student learning and conclude that publicity might be a way to solve the problem of corruption and diversion of funds in the provision of local services.

Daniel Gros, 26 January 2006

Written January 2006: What is the key to excellence of a nation’s education system? New data suggest that governmental efficiency is critical. This implies that one cannot just copy educational programmes from one country to another. Programmes that work in highly efficient countries might fail in nations with less efficient public administrations.

Pages

Events