New Directions in Welfare

29 June - 1 July 2009, St Catherine's College, Oxford University

This 3 day conference at St Catherine's College, Oxford University hosts speakers from Oxford, LSE, UCL, World Bank brings together many of the new and emerging themes in the economics of welfare. Theory tracks focus on social choice and welfare, and other related aspects of welfare economic theory and public economics. Empirical/applied tracks focus on policy areas including health, development, social policy, environment, education, poverty reduction, non-monetary measures of economic progress etc. Papers on applied econometrics or experimental work relevant to welfare economic theory and assumptions about human behaviour also welcome.

Organizer(s):
Paul Anand
Type:
Conference
Location:
St Catherine's College, Oxford University
Attendance:
Open attendance
Contact:
paul.anand@education.ox.ac.uk
Institution:
The event is being organised from a number of universities led by the Open University.
More information:
http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/welfareconomicstheory/

Disclaimer: Vox is not responsible for the accuracy of this information.


Topic(s):
Frontiers of economic research
Tags:
development, economic theory, education, ethics, EU policies, experimental economics, Frontiers of economic research, health economics, migration, poverty and income inequality, welfare state and social Europe

‘Neurofacturing’: the impact on inequality and the implications for education

Edward Leamer interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam, 26 Sep 2008

At the Global Economic Symposium in Schleswig-Holstein in September 2008, Edward Leamer of the University of California, Los Angeles spoke at a session on inequality and globalisation. Afterwards, he talked to Romesh Vaitilingam about his concept of ‘neurofacturing’ (creating value through knowledge work rather than physical labour), its rising significance in the world of the personal computer and the internet, the impact on inequality and the implications for our education systems.

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Topics: Education, International trade, Labour markets
Tags: 'neofacturing', education, Global Economic Symposium, globalisation, Inequality

Towards evidence-based reform of European universities

Rick van der Ploeg, Reinhilde Veugelers, 27 September 2008

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As Europe approaches the world technology possibility frontier and leaves the era of catching up, innovation and highly educated people have become crucial drivers of its growth potential. If forces must be mobilised in Europe to create the most competitive and knowledge-based economy of the 21st century, European universities must play a key role.

Topics: Education
Tags: education, European universities

Longevity and investment in human capital: Lessons from today's developed countries

Moshe Hazan, 27 September 2008

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Conventional wisdom suggests that an increase in life expectancy raises the time period over which investments in schooling can be amortised, thus raising schooling. Figure 1 shows the positive correlation between life expectancy at age 5 and average years of schooling for American men born between 1840 and 1970.

Topics: Development, Health economics
Tags: economic growth, education, life expectancy

What does state-level data tell us about the social value of education?

Steven Yamarik, 19 September 2008

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A good deal of the direct cost of education is subsidised by governments. In most Western countries, the government provides at least ten years of schooling at no cost to the student. At the university level, tuition and fees are often charged, but there is still substantial government funding.

Topics: Education
Tags: education, Online Education, positive externalities

Schools, skills, and synapses

James J. Heckman, 25 August 2008

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America has a growing skills problem. One consequence of this skills problem is rising inequality and polarization of society. A greater fraction of young Americans are graduating from college. At the same time, a greater fraction are dropping out of high school.

Topics: Education, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: childhood intervention, education, income inequality, skill inequality

Choice of friends and performance at school

Yves Zenou interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam, 15 Aug 2008

Yves Zenou talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research on the sources of differences in school performance between students of different races, which uses data on friendship groups among American teenagers. He finds that having a higher percentage of same-race friends has a positive effect on white teenagers’ test scores but a negative effect on black teenagers’ test scores.

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Topics: Education
Tags: education, friends

Many children left behind? Textbooks and test scores in Kenya

Paul Glewwe, Michael Kremer, Sylvie Moulin , 20 August 2008

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Education is often seen as critical to economic development. In recent years, more and more children have been going to school. The challenge moving forward is arguably to improve school quality.

Topics: Education
Tags: education, Kenya

The legacy: Beyond nukes

Arvind Subramanian, 6 August 2008

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The typical window of opportunity for reform is early in a government’s tenure. Having squandered the “honeymoon” period and beyond, the Indian coalition government and the Indian Prime Minister, Dr.

Topics: Education
Tags: education, India, reform

Education and the timing of fertility

Karin Monstad, Carol Propper, Kjell G. Salvanes, 6 May 2008

Low fertility has become an issue of public concern as low population growth and higher dependency ratios due to aging populations threaten to strangle economic growth. While numerous studies have found evidence for a correlation between female education and fertility decisions, few have examined factors likely to influence these decisions.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6816.asp
Topics: Education
Tags: causal effect, education, female fertility

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