The labour market effects of immigration and emigration in OECD countries

Frédéric Docquier, Çağlar Özden, Giovanni Peri 06 October 2014

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The basis of the debate about migration into European countries is the perception that immigrants are unskilled and poor. Hence, the narrative goes, their arrival hurts the wages and employment prospects of less educated natives. At the same time, very little discussion is devoted to the patterns and economic consequences of emigration from European countries to other developed countries. The recent high-profile book by Collier (2013) is a typical example of this approach. Yet, the data indicate this might all be misguided.

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Topics:  Education Labour markets Migration

Tags:  OECD, migration, immigration, emigration, wages, complementarities, education

Life cycle earnings, education premiums, and internal rates of return

Manudeep Bhuller, Magne Mogstad, Kjell G. Salvanes 22 September 2014

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Many empirical studies use cross-section data to estimate Mincer regressions of log earnings on years of schooling and (potential) experience (see the review articles by Card 1999, Harmon et al. 2003, Psacharopoulos and Patrinos 2004, and Heckman et al. 2006). The problem of selection bias can be addressed by controlling for correlated determinants of earnings or with an instrumental variable for schooling. However, it is not clear how the coefficient on schooling should be interpreted.

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Topics:  Education Labour markets

Tags:  education, Labour Markets, Mincer regressions, pensions, earnings, schooling, Norway, taxes, education premium, returns to education

The unrecognised benefits of grade inflation

Raphael Boleslavsky, Christopher Cotton 16 August 2014

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Since the early 1980s, the mean grade point average at American colleges and universities has risen at a rate of between 0.1 and 0.15 points per decade. Most of this increase can be attributed to an increase in the share of As assigned (which now comprise nearly half of all grades), with significant drops in the assignment of lower grades (Rojstaczer 2011 and Rojstaczer and Healy 2012).

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Topics:  Education Labour markets

Tags:  education, human capital, investment, grade inflation

Complexity and the art of public policy

Roland Kupers interviewed by Viv Davies,

Date Published

Fri, 07/25/2014

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See Also

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society’s Problems from the Bottom Up (David Colander & Roland Kupers, 2014), Princeton University Press.

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Topics

Politics and economics
Tags
education, democracy, Society

Related Article(s)

Culture: Persistence and evolution The failed policy response to the Global Crisis
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June 2014

Institutions, trade shocks, and regional differences in long-run educational and development trajectories

André Carlos Martínez, Aldo Musacchio, Martina Viarengo 09 July 2014

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Understanding the determinants of long-run socio-economic development is a major concern for academics and policymakers in many countries around the world. In particular, beyond understanding differences in development or educational and other outcomes across countries, the origins of within-country inequality are now a fundamental issue, given the impact inequality has on the long-run prosperity of nations.

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Topics:  Development Economic history Education

Tags:  development, education, growth, institutions, Inequality, Brazil, colonialism, trade shocks, extractive institutions

Curriculum and ideology

Davide Cantoni, Yuyu Chen, David Y. Yang, Noam Yuchtman, Y. Jane Zhang 29 May 2014

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Education shapes young minds. Contemporary debates rage on whether it also shapes people’s political views, attitudes, and their values. Examples range from teaching of evolution in US schools, to the role of madrassas in the Islamic world, and the coverage of World War II in Japanese history textbooks. In 2012, an attempt to introduce a mainland Chinese curriculum into Hong Kong schools led to tens of thousands of people taking to the streets in protest.

Scholars across the social sciences have argued that schools play an important role in shaping political attitudes:

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Topics:  Education

Tags:  education, China, curriculum reform

The mainstream economics curriculum needs an overhaul

Diane Coyle 04 May 2014

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One of the delayed consequences of the financial crisis is a widespread and apparently growing desire to change how economics is taught. Students in a number of countries, including vocal groups in Chile and the UK, have recently intensified the demand for reform. One recent example is a report from the Post-Crash Economics Society at the University of Manchester (Post-Crash Economics Society 2014).

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Topics:  Education Global crisis

Tags:  education, financial crisis, global crisis, academia, teaching, economics education, undergraduates

Human capital and income inequality: Some facts and some puzzles

Amparo Castelló-Climent, Rafael Doménech 23 April 2014

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The rise of income inequality in many countries from 1985 onwards, and particularly during the recent crisis, has prompted a current debate on the causes and consequences of higher inequality and its effects on future growth (see, for example, OECD 2011, IMF 2014, or Ostry et al. 2014). As a result, and despite the slight reduction from 1960 to 1985, the average income Gini coefficient for developing countries was almost the same in 1960 (0.42) as it was in 2005 (0.41).

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Topics:  Development Education Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  education, globalisation, human capital, Inequality, skill-biased technological change

What's in a name? Quite a lot it seems

Gregory Clark interviewed by Viv Davies,

Date Published

Fri, 04/04/2014

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See Also

Clark,G., N Cummins, H Yu, and D Diaz Vidal (2014) The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility, Princeton University Press.

 

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Topics

Poverty and income inequality
Tags
education, Intergenerational Mobility, social mobility

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Where is the land of opportunity? Intergenerational mobility in the US Get together for the kids Do elite universities admit the academically best students?
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March 2014

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Drinking during pregnancy and children’s test scores

Sarah Lewis, Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, George L Wehby, Luisa Zuccolo 08 March 2014

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The US Surgeon General first published a report on drinking during pregnancy in 1981, drawing attention to the link between prenatal alcohol consumption and birth defects (Office of the US Surgeon General 1981). The detrimental effects of excessive drinking during pregnancy are now well-known – it potentially leads to a pattern of mental and physical defects known as Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. The effects of low-to-moderate drinking, however, are less conclusive, and there is no consensus as to what level of exposure is toxic to the foetus.

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Topics:  Health economics

Tags:  education, alcohol, pregnancy

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