Eurozone bank integration: EU versus non-EU banks

Vincent Bouvatier, Anne-Laure Delatte 14 December 2014

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In 2013, cross-border capital flows were 40% of their 2007 level (McKinsey Global Institute 2013). While the reversal was in all broad categories of flows (Forbes and Warnock 2012), the sharpest decline in activity was in international bank loans extended cross-border or by local affiliates (Milesi-Ferretti and Tilles 2011), a fact that has prominently driven contraction in the real economy (Cetorelli and Goldberg 2011, 2012).

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance

Tags:  euro, eurozone, financial integration, capital flows, banking, cross-border capital flows

Why is euro inflation so low?

Jean-Pierre Landau 02 December 2014

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Inflation in the Eurozone stood at 0.4% (year on year) in November. It has been persistently declining for almost a year, and constantly undershooting forecasts. The Eurozone is now clearly diverging from many advanced economies, where inflation is either on the rise – albeit at moderate levels – as in the US, or, when falling, still remaining close to target, as the UK.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  inflation, eurozone, safe assets, safety trap, risk aversion, disinflation, exchange rates, interest rates, liquidity trap, zero lower bound, monetary policy, public debt, Eurozone crisis, Central Banks, ECB, quantitative easing, long-term refinancing operations, unconventional monetary policy, liquidity, asset-backed securities, securitisation, debt sustainability, fiscal space, fiscal capacity, balance sheets

Time to scrap the Stability and Growth Pact

Paolo Manasse 01 December 2014

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In recent years the European fiscal framework has undergone important reforms (see Frayne and Riso 2013). In 2005, the Stability and Growth Pact was amended in order to take country-specific considerations and economic conditions into account.

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Topics:  EU policies Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  eurozone, Stability and Growth Pact, fiscal policy, fiscal rules, convergence, fiscal discipline, Fiscal Compact Treaty, debt sustainability

After AQR and stress tests – where next for banking in the Eurozone?

Thorsten Beck 10 November 2014

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The ECB has concluded and published the results of a year-long painstaking process to go through the books of the 130 largest and most important banks of the Eurozone, adjusting balance sheets and testing the sensitivity of their capital position to two different scenarios, one of which includes a severe economic downturn. This exercise constitutes the entry point to the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM), where the ECB has direct supervisory responsibility for most of these 130 banks and indirect responsibility for the rest of the banks in countries that are members of the SSM.

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  ECB, eurozone, banking union, stress tests, Asset Quality Review, forbearance, recapitalisation, balance sheets, leverage, bank resolution

How to climb a mountain with both hands tied

Jean Pisani-Ferry 07 November 2014

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Against the background of lacklustre global demand, economic growth in Europe has weakened again. In the Eurozone, a third recession in less than seven years is a distinct possibility. Yet economic policy looks powerless. On the monetary side, although the ECB may still embark on a genuine programme of quantitative easing, such action is unlikely to deliver a major boost because the benchmark 10-year government bonds already yield just 1%.

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Topics:  Environment EU policies Macroeconomic policy Microeconomic regulation

Tags:  Europe, eurozone, recession, stimulus, monetary policy, quantitative easing, fiscal policy, structural reforms, labour market reforms, liquidity trap, investment, Cash for clunkers, scrapping subsidies, environment, regulation, emissions standards

Macroeconomic policy mix in the transatlantic economy

Moreno Bertoldi, Philip R. Lane, Valérie Rouxel-Laxton, Paolo Pesenti 24 October 2014

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The reason why the macroeconomic policy mix has been different on the two sides of the Atlantic in recent years remains a hotly debated issue. Was it due to a different reading of the root causes of the Global Crisis and, therefore, of the type of policy response considered most appropriate?

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Topics:  Global crisis Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  eurozone, US, macroeconomic policy, transatlantic economy, global crisis

What macroeconomic policies for the Eurozone?

Francesco Giavazzi, Guido Tabellini 25 September 2014

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In his recent article on Vox, Roberto Perotti takes issue with the proposal of coordinating a monetary and fiscal expansion in the Eurozone through a money-financed temporary tax cut, which we advocated in a column on 21 August (see Perotti 2014, Giavazzi and Tabellini 2014). He does not question the effectiveness of the proposal in stimulating aggregate demand.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  eurozone, Eurozone economy, macroeconomic policy, Budget deficit, fiscal expansion

Eurozone recovery: there are no shortcuts

Roberto Perotti 13 September 2014

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The consensus is increasing that austerity has not worked – Europe stands on the edge of deflation and suffers from a deficit of demand. A recent VoxEU proposal (Giavazzi and Tabellini 2014) offers a solution that is widely shared on both sides of the Atlantic – all Eurozone countries should cut taxes simultaneously by 5% of GDP, and the ECB should buy the extra debt without sterilisation. This should be accompanied by a credible plan to reduce government spending in the future.

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Topics:  Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  austerity, eurozone, monetary policy, helicopter money, quantitative easing, QE, stimulus, fiscal consolidation, fiscal policy, spending cuts, fiscal sustainability, debt monetisation

Is the ECB doing QE?

Charles Wyplosz 12 September 2014

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The 4 September announcement by Chairman Mario Draghi has been greeted with enthusiasm by the markets and the media. It has been long awaited, and many believe that the ECB has finally delivered. This is not sure. The ECB intends to buy large amounts of securities backed by bank lending to households (mortgages) and to firms.

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Topics:  Exchange rates Financial markets Monetary policy

Tags:  quantitative easing, QE, monetary policy, unconventional monetary policy, ECB, securitisation, bank lending, Europe, eurozone, Subprime, stress tests, deleveraging, recapitalisation, depreciation, exchange rates, euro, central banking

To exit the Great Recession, central banks must adapt their policies and models

Marcus Miller, Lei Zhang 10 September 2014

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“Practical men…are usually the slaves…[of] some academic scribbler of a few years back” – John Maynard Keynes.

For monetary policy to be most effective, Michael Woodford emphasised the crucial importance of managing expectations. For this purpose, he advocated that central banks adopt explicit rules for setting interest rates to check inflation and recession, and went on to note that:

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Topics:  Global crisis Macroeconomic policy Monetary policy

Tags:  Taylor rule, forward guidance, great moderation, global crisis, Great Recession, quantitative easing, DSGE models, expectations, tapering, US, UK, Europe, eurozone, ECB, Bank of England, central banking, IMF, unconventional monetary policy

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